Chapter 9: Data Compilation

(SRAPO/Chapter 9: Data Compilation)

In Chapter 9: Data Compilation, we’ll draw together data covering the spectrum of our model alien worlds. Using the templates provided in Chapter 10 Templates, you can create a good conceptual model of any habitable planet covered in this study.

Initial Environments Compilation Table
The Initial Environments Compilation Table, below, provides the specific conditions within the physical or biological environments of our model worlds. Firstly, we’ll examine a small section of the table as seen in the cells at left.
The table’s columns are labeled with the APST (average planetary surface temperature); rows are labeled with  Planetary Mass (relative to Earth which =1.0).
Every combination of APST & Planetary Mass contains a box with a list of numbers; these numbers, become line numbers in a list of specific surface conditions found within the environment of that particular planet.
In order to extract information from the table, choose a planetary mass and an associated APST, then read the numbers in the corresponding data box.  If for example we chose a ‘damp’, 0.5 Earth mass planet with a ‘cold’ 0ºC APST, we’d find the data box containing the numbers, see box at left: 12,16,19, 27, 28, 31, 33, 37, 40.

Next, look ahead to The Initial Environments Compilation List and read the associated line numbers, for example;
>  #12 from the Initial Environments Compilation Table is read from line number 12 in the Initial Environments Compilation List, which states; “The planet’s light cloud cover allows for large day and night temperature fluctuations.”
> # 16 in the Initial Environments Compilation Table references, #16 in the List, stating; “The planet carries large polar ice caps, whose formation subsequently increases the dry land area in lower latitudes.”

Initial Environments Compilation Table


Initial Environments Compilation List
1. Life as we know it may not exist.
2. This is a desert world.
3. Free water may temporarily exist in various locations.
4.  High  average surface temperatures and low planetary escape velocity have resulted in most of the liquid surface water being lost.
5.  Life forms display specialized water use adoptions.
6.  Most of the planets free water has probably been lost.
7.  This is an arid world that has been slowly losing its water.
8.  This is an ice world.
9.  This is a cool temperate world.
10. Low temperatures and high escape velocities may have caused this large planet to retain much of its primitive hydrogen atmosphere.
11.  The planet has a nearly continuous cloud cover, which helps depress day temperatures and elevate/moderate night temperatures.
12.  The planets light cloud cover allows for large day and night temperature fluctuations.
13.  This is a water world.
14.  Continents may not exit; islands may provide the only dry land mass.
15.  This large world has three times the water producing mass of Earth, but only 10% more surface area for the water to cover.
16.  The planet has large polar ice caps, whose formation subsequently increases the surface area of dry land.
17.  Small continents and large islands are probably the main land masses.
18.  This rather large planet has two times the water producing mass of Earth, but only 42% more surface area of dry land.
19.  Forest like vegetation may be the most important land crop.
20.  Grass like vegetation may be the most important land crop.
21.  Desert like vegetation may be the most important land crop.
22.  Tropical type forests may be the most important land crop.
23.  Ice caps are present in the planets polar regions.
24.  Permafrost caps exist in the planets polar region.
25.  The planet has large hot, arid deserts in continental rain shadows.
26.  The sense of smell may be more acute than on Earth.
27.  The sense of smell may be less acute than on Earth.
28.  Communication may not be as sound dependant as on Earth.
29.  Communication may be more sound dependant than on Earth.
30.  Communication mat be by sonar using bat like high frequency echo location.
31.  Low temperatures allow for the formation of very complex molecules.
32.  High temperatures threaten complex molecules.
33.  Cool temperatures result in slower chemical reactions and perhaps longer life spans.
34.  Warm temperatures result in faster chemical reactions and perhaps shorter life spans.
35.  The planets rapid rate of rotation helps reduce day to night temperature differences.
36.  The planets slow rate of rotation increases the day to night temperature difference.
37.  Many life forms on this planet would be described as ‘long and spindly’.
38.  Many life forms on this planet would be described as ‘short and squat’.
39.  Animal life has developed an efficient means of getting rid of internal heat at a high rate.
40.  Animal life has developed an efficient means of generating and storing internal energy at a high rate.
41.  The minimum weight for an intelligent Being with a highly developed brain is 40 to 50 pounds (this seemingly critical lower mass would have different      weights on the various planetary models).
42.  The APST is too hot for permanent polar ice caps. With low axial inclination polar regions would have moderate temperatures, but low illumination.

Star-Planet Energy Relationship Table
In the table, Star-Planet Energy Relationships Table, immediately below, each model planet’s mass and the parameters leading to the average surface temperature are compared to provide the resulting associated: % cloud cover, solar constant and albedo; this information will be useful in filling in the templates that follow in Chapter 10.

Star-Planet Energy Relationship Table

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Table of Planet Surface Conditions
The Table of Planet Surface Conditions, large sideways chart below, was derived from combinations of the physical parameters existing on our model planets. On the table, you’ll find planetary mass rows listed along left margin. Reading from left to right along each row, you will intersect with columns of various environmental characteristics and potentials associated with that chosen mass (planet size).

For example, let’s examine a 2.0 Earth mass planet: Reading across the table, the conditions we would expect to encounter on that world would be a:
•  L  (large) potential for wind generating energy,
•  M  (medium) expectancy for wide use of buried organics for fuel, i.e.  petroleum/coal,
•  S  (small) expectancy that solar power will provide much energy.

Further along that same row we find the planet has the addition probable characteristics (among others):
•  G  (great/much) volcanism, as compared to Earth,
•  S  (small) mountain height,
•  and, a 150 pound man on Earth would weigh 204 pounds there.

Continuing to read across the row titled, 2.0 Earth mass,but now looking at the far right side of the table,  we find that with;
•  A 0ºC (-32 º F) APST, the planet would have M (medium) or average (somewhat similar) humidity as found on Earth.
•  At 45ºC (113ºF ) APST, the average humidity would be considered VH (very high)  compared with the Earth average.

The Relative Humidity  sub-table (far lower right) was derived from the considerations that:
a) A graded land-water ratio exists on the study planets and that the water coverage to area dry land ratio increases with the mass of the planet.
b) The greater the mass of the planet, the greater the atmospheric density.
c) As the APST increases, the average  planetary humidity increases. On two planets with the same APST: The smaller planet, with a thin, light atmosphere and relatively small bodies of water, will have lower humidity than a large planet with its heavier, denser atmosphere and large bodies of water.

Comparing the various data in the Table of Planet Surface Conditions, you can see that Man could potentially do quite well on some of the model planets, but would be under considerable biological stress under others; examples can be seen below, from an examination of several variables in the following small table, which was extracted from Environments Table IV.

Condition Selected
Conditions
Man’s weight Humidity Atmospheric
Oxygen
1. 1.0 Earth,
APST 59ºF
150 lbs. Medium Medium
2. 0.5 Earth,
APST 32ºF
103 lbs. Very dry Weak / little
3. 2.0 Earth,
APST 113ºF
204 lbs. Very high Much / great

.
Condition 1:  An Earth like planet, used for comparing Conditions 1 & 2 below.
Condition 2: The planet’s lower gravity results in a human colonist weighing less than on Earth. Man is therefore more mobile, physical activity is less taxing and he requires less oxygen; however,  there is less oxygen available in the thinner atmosphere. The planets habitable equatorial region has temperatures in the 41ºF to 45ºF range. Cool temperatures and low humidity would result in outdoor work conditions similar to those encountered during the Fall season in Earth’s mid latitudes.
Condition 3:  The planet’s higher gravity results in the Human colonists effectively carrying an additional 54 pound body weight. High gravity, high humidity and quite warm temperatures would create an environment more difficult for Man to settle. The planet’s habitable temperature zone basically extends from 50º to 70º latitude and carries a rapidly decreasing temperature across the latitudes, from 99ºF to 41ºF across this band. On the positive side, there is a large amount of atmospheric oxygen which would assist in labor and increase the efficiency of converting organics into electricity, etc. The planet would be more ideally suited to a short (about 4 feet tall) and slender intelligent being. This species expansion would probably require specialized adoptions to rid their body of heat. If the planet orbited a F class star, we might expect to find the alien with darker skin pigmentation, particularly in lower latitudes. Warm blooded animal life on such a planet may not have developed heavy fur coats as are found on Earth mammals.

Table of Planet Surface Conditions

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This study can be used:
1.  To understand star-planet-biological relationships
2.  Determine general planetary environments
3.  Assist in the study of Humans and human technological adaptively under a variety of habitable extraterrestrial conditions.
4.  Back track an intelligent alien, that is, given a description of the intelligent alien’s form you will be able to derive a general model of his home planet, thereby narrowing the range of a) detected habitable star-planet configurations we know of, to date, b) or other Main Sequence stars, from which he came.

See also:
a) The Visual Exoplanet Catalog: < http://exoplanet.hanno-rein.de/complete.php&gt;
b)  The continuously updated list of known multi planetary systems at, <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_multiplanetary_systems>
c) The extra Solar Planets catalog at, <http://exoplanet.eu/catalog.php&gt;

Continued in Chapter 10: Templates

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