A few other storage items to consider

(Survival Manual/Prepper articles/A few other  storage items to consider)

RainManA.  16 SHTF Barter Items to Stockpile
12 March 2012, DebtReconing, by Tyler
Pasted from: http://debtreckoning.com/shtf-barter-items-to-stockpile/

Every good survivalist has a stockpile of things he or she recognizes their family may need to survive a natural or man-made disaster. However, many people forget the value of maintaining a barter store as well.

If things hit the fan, particularly in an economic collapse where the dollar is nearly worthless, a number of non-monetary goods will be more valuable than a fistful of dollar bills.

It’s also important to recognize that we can’t possibly store enough of every item to account for every scenario for an indefinite period of time. However, what we can do is have some items on hand to barter with neighbors to plug gaps in our preparations.

Imagine a neighbor with a large garden and some chickens trading a half dozen eggs and some squash for a box of ammo, or a small bottle of Vodka.

Consider stocking up on the following items, even if you have no plans to use them yourself, for their potential barter value.
storage items 1.
16 Things to Stockpile with High Barter Value:
Cigarettes. I hate smoking, and can’t stand being around anyone that smokes. Having said that, I recognize that in a SHTF situation many others will be cut off from their access to cigarettes, so there is plenty of barter potential.

Soap. Bars of soap, and even those little cleaning napkins/wipes that you get at the BBQ restaurants could be very valuable in a SHTF scenario. Ever see “The Book of Eli?”

Bullets. Obviously, it’s a good idea to have a decent store of ammo representing all calibers of the weapons you own. However, it is also a good idea to store extra ammo in common calibers (9mm, .22, .38, 12-guage shells, etc.) as a potential barter. After all, a gun without ammo is just an inaccurate throwing object.

Alcohol. Alcohol could serve a variety of purposes in a SHTF situation. It is valuable as a potential bartering commodity, and it also has medicinal uses. Did you know Vodka is a great home remedy to counteract the reaction to poison ivy?

MREs. More portable and easier to barter than larger 5-gallon buckets, or even #10 cans of dried foods, MREs are great to have on hand for bartering. Keep a variety of flavors and different kinds of foods because you could be holding something that could complete a meal for a hungry person.

Silver Coins. Keep in mind this doesn’t necessarily mean only silver dollars with a full ounce of silver, but even older, less expensive coins with a high silver component (the 1964 Kennedy half-dollar, for example).

Detergent. Don’t think people are interested in bartering detergent? Check out the story about the recent rash of detergent thefts across the country. Apparently, Tide detergent on the black market is now referred to as “liquid gold.” Interesting.

Water bottles. To someone in bad need of water, a water bottle could be worth its weight in gold. Remember the rule of threes: you can live three minutes without air, three days without water, and three weeks without food. Store accordingly.

Matches and lighters. A box of matches is relatively inexpensive, but for someone needing to build a fire a pack of matches or a lighter could be very valuable. Be sure these are stored safely, and if they are not waterproof make them so by storing in a watertight container.

Sugar. My grandfather used to tell stories of things that were in limited supply in the Great Depression. Sugar was something he often mentioned. Imagine how easily you could win over a sweet-tooth with the promise of a bag of sugar in exchange for something you are short on.

Toilet paper. This one is rather self-explanatory, isn’t it? Sure, there are substitutes for Charmin, but who wants to keep using leaves when paper feels so much better.

Water Filters/Purifiers. Water purification drops and filters could mean the difference in offering family members treated water or potentially harmful, bacteria-infested water. Who’d be willing to trade for that?

Bleach. May be used to disinfect water, or keep living quarters and soiled clothing sanitized.

Batteries. Can be used to power up flashlights, radios, and other electronic devices.

Candles. Emergency candles would be a great barter item for those in need of providing some light to their living quarters without electricity.

storage items 2 .

B.  50 Survival Items You Forgot To Buy
14 January 2013, UrbanSurvivalSite.com, by Matthew
Pasted from: http://urbansurvivalsite.com/50-survival-items-you-forgot-to-buy/

If you’re reading this, you probably already know the basics: water purification, food storage, first aid, lighters, flashlights, etc. But even hardcore survivalists can overlook things. In this post I want to mention 50 survival items you might have forgotten to buy.

I already mentioned several of these in the post, Unusual Survival Gear, but this is a much longer list. It’s not comprehensive, but hopefully it’ll remind you of a few things you still need to get. For everything on this list that you already have, give yourself a pat on the back.

1. Acoustic Instruments – For entertainment and morale.
2. Aluminum Foil– Great for all sorts of things like cooking food, boiling water, enhancing antennas, keeping sunlight out, etc.
3. Axes– How else will you chop firewood?
4. Baby Wipes– Really easy way to keep clean.
5. Baseballs, basketballs, footballs, etc. – Playing ball is a great way to stave off boredom and keep morale up during hard times.
6. Bicycle Gear – If gasoline is in short supply, you might need your bike to get around. That means you’ll need a bike pump, extra tubes, etc.
7. Book lights– It’s difficult to read by candlelight and you don’t want to waste your flashlight’s batteries. Book lights are cheap and last a long time.
8. Books – You might be surprised how much free time you have after the SHTF, especially when you’re on guard while others sleep. Now’s your chance to read those books you always meant to read (like Atlas Shrugged).
9. Bug Spray– There is usually a major lack of proper sanitation after a disaster, especially if there isn’t running water. That means there will be more roaches and other critters. There might also be a lot more mosquitoes.
10. Bouillon Cubes– These make boring meals much more delicious.
11. Calendars– You’ll need a way to track the day and date if the power is out for a long time.
12. Candy – Huge morale booster during difficult times. Just don’t overdo it.
13. Cast Iron Cookware– If you’re cooking over a fire, your regular pots and skillets won’t cut it.
14. Cloth Diapers – Other than the obvious usage, these are also great for cleanups because they’re so absorbent.
15. Clothes Lines and Pins – Because your dryer will be a waste of space.
16. Condiments – Imagine eating a typical meal without mustard, ketchup, soy sauce, hot sauce, etc. You’ll get bored fast.
17. Condoms – TEOTWAWKI is not a great time to get pregnant, but people still have needs. Use protection.
18. Cotton Balls – Great for first aid, cleaning, kindling, and many other things.
19. Duct Tape – A must have for any prepper.
20. Ear Plugs – It’s important to use these when hunting with firearms, but they’ll also help you sleep at night. Why? Because after the SHTF every little bump will wake you up. Just make sure someone is standing guard while you sleep.
21. Floss – It’s even more important than your tooth brush. If you’re not flossing now, get started. (See “Get Your Teeth Fixed“)
22. Games – Board games, cards, crossword puzzles, jigsaw puzzles, and any other type of game that doesn’t require power. This is especially important if you have children.
23. Glasses and Repair Kits – If you wear glasses, make sure you have a backup pair and a way to fix them.
24. Glow Sticks – A great way to find your way around in a dark house.
25. Goggles – This includes safety goggles and swim goggles. You never know.
26. Hand Sanitizer – As I mentioned above, there might be a lack of proper sanitation after a major disaster. Stay germ-free.
27. Instant Coffee – If you’re hooked on coffee (like I am), then you’re liable to go crazy when your coffee pot won’t turn on.
28. Map of Your Town – Most of us have gotten used to relying on Google Maps and GPS, but those could become things of the past. Paper maps never stop working.
29. Paper Plates – So you won’t have to waste water cleaning dishes.
30. Pencil and Paper – These are historic times so keep a journal. Also important for games and making lists.
31. Pet Supplies. Don’t forget about your pets! There’s a detailed list of pet supplies in this post.
32. Plant Pots – Plants often easier to grow in pots than in the ground.
33. Plastic Sheeting – For repairing leaks, collecting water, keeping out contaminants, and much more.
34. Powdered Butter and Eggs – It’s amazing how many recipes require butter and/or eggs. These are hard to store long-term, so try some of the powdered variety.
35. Powdered Juice Mix – Because you’re going to get sick of drinking room-temperature water.
36. Saw – Axes are good for chopping firewood, but you’ll need a saw for everything else.
37. Sewing Kit – If your clothes tear, you might not be able to afford or even get access to new ones. Learn how to sew.
38. Shoe Laces – Again, you might not be able to get new ones. Plus, shoe laces have several uses.
39. Shut-off Wrench – Very important if you have gas power. A broken gas line is extremely dangerous.
40. Slingshots – Another way to kill small animals for food.
41. Snow Shoes – You’ll be trapped in a snowstorm without them.
42. Song Books – As with acoustic instruments (mentioned above), these are good for entertainment and morale boosting.
43. Survival Books – You’ll need this as a reference. Check out my post, The 10 Best Books On Survival.
44. Tampons – You really don’t want to be without these. Ask your wife what type she prefers and order them in bulk.
45. Tarps – Use them to keep stuff dry, provide shade, carry things, and so forth.
46. Umbrellas – Do you have one? If so, does it work well? And do you have extras for your family members?
47. Whistles – These can be a lifesaver if someone is under attack or lost.
48. Wind-up Clocks – So you don’t have to waste batteries.
49. Yard Bags – Heavy duty bags will be useful for all the trash and debris that accumulates.
50. Ziploc Bags – Great for keeping things dry and organized.
.
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C.  5 Food Storage Items That Will Last Longer Than Any Apocalypse
30 Oct 2013, AmericanpreppersNetwork.com, guest post by: Lee Flynn
Pasted from: http://americanpreppersnetwork.com/2013/10/5-food-storage-items-will-last-longer-apocalypse.html

One of the biggest concerns people have with food storage is shelf life. After all, nobody wants to dip into their emergency food supply during a real honest-to-goodness disaster and find that all of their “imperishable” goods have decomposed into brown sludge. It’s true, many foods such as canned goods and frozen meals don’t last as long as you might expect. But what can you do? Well, for starters, you can do some in-depth research into what you decide to store (which is probably why you’re here in the first place). For another thing, you can stock up on foods that really will last forever. Here are five of the longest lasting emergency food storage items available.

1. Salt- Although, depending on who you talk to, salt may not technically be a “food,”  this mineral has been used in conjunction with food for the better part of, well, forever. Evidence of salt extraction operations dates back about 9,000 years. To give you some scope, the wheel wasn’t invented until about 3,000 years later. Being a mineral instead of any sort of organic material, salt is completely immune to microbial attack. That means that it won’t spoil, and it helps prevent spoilage in other foods. It also enhances taste, so if you do catch yourself in a situation where you have to live off of bland emergency food, you’ll be happy if you’ve got some salt nearby. As for its shelf life, well, it’s a rock; it will last forever, or until you eat it.

2. Honey- Honey is a wonderful substance. Unlike salt, it is 100% organic. It’s also 100% healthy for you to eat. Raw honey has natural antibacterial, antimicrobial, and anti-fungal properties, it boosts the human immune system, and can even be used to soothe symptoms associated with the common cold. It’s high in calories, so in a low-food situation it will give you much needed energy on an otherwise empty stomach. You can also spread it on burns for temporary relief, making honey a useful first aid supply too. Perhaps most amazing is that honey doesn’t seem to ever go bad. For example, 3,000 year old honey unearthed from an Egyptian tomb was still edible. It may change its consistency and crystallize/harden, but when heated it will simply return to its original state. Be warned, however, honey can be dangerous for children under 1 year of age, so keep it away from them.

storage items 33. Dried white rice- If properly stored, white rice can last upwards of 30 years in storage. I know that doesn’t sound too impressive compare to the forever shelf lives of salt and honey, but come on, 30 years is a really long time. If you were to start your food storage on the day you were born, and live to be 90 years old, you’d only have to replace this stuff maybe three times. White rice also has a variety of uses. It’s filling, contains calories, protein, and certain vitamins and nutrients, and is easy to prepare. Brown rice has more nutrients than white, but it doesn’t store quite as well.

4. Freeze dried foods- Freeze dried foods are made by rapidly freezing meals, and then leaching the water from them leaving only a frozen, dry substance that can be easily packaged and stored. Adding a little boiling water will reconstitute the food into something not only edible, but downright palatable and healthy. See, the freeze drying process is able retain the taste and nutrients of the original meal. Different freeze dried foods can be safely stored for varying lengths of time, but regardless of what you use, their shelf lives usually end up being about 20–30 years. Compare that to most canned goods, which only last for 3–5 years.

5. Dehydrated foods- Although not quite as long-lasting as freeze dried meals, dehydrated foods still have long shelf lives. This is because they follow the same basic process: moisture is removed and then the item is packaged. The difference is that with conventional dehydration techniques, only about 90% of the moisture is removed (as opposed to freeze drying, which removes approximately 98% of the moisture). Thus, dehydrated foods only last about 15–20 years before needing to be replaced. Still, that’s really not bad, when you think about it.

 ..

D.  Great tasting “Survival soup”
[Prepackage the ingredients and vacuum seal for nutritious meals. Mr Larry]
Excerpt pasted from: http://americanpreppersnetwork.com/2012/08/a-year-of-food-storage-for-300-for-a-family-of-four.html

survival soup How to make your soup:
8 oz  of rice
2 oz of red kidney beans
2 oz  of pearl barley
2 oz of lintels
1 oz  of split green peas
1 oz of chick peas/garbanzo’s
Bouillon to taste

Take the 16 oz dry mixture and add 6-7 quarts of water with a spoon of butter or olive oil (optional) to prevent the water from boiling over.  Add 3 tablespoons bouillon or to taste.  Then add any other meats, vegetables, potatoes or seasonings you’d like to.  I personally love to add garlic and Lima beans.  DO NOT add onions.  They will spoil the mixture. Bring to a boil and then let simmer for two hours.  You should have enough to feed 4 people for two days if rationed correctly.

Note: Onions ferment too quickly and will cut the time you are able to store the already cooked soup mixture. There is always the option of dried onions and you can add it to smaller batches you know will be eaten on the first day.

On the second day you will need to add more water and a tablespoon of bouillon because it will thicken in the refrigerator overnight. Boil for a min of ten minutes to kill off any potential bacteria, especially if you’re not able to store it in the refrigerator because you’re without electricity.

You will be full off of ONE large bowl of this delicious soup.  The kids usually eat about a half a bowl with bread.  That’s what makes it so great.  If able to, bake some bread or corn bread to go with it.

If there is any mixture left on the third day, then just add it to the new mixture you make.  (If making a new mixture on the third day) As time goes by you will learn to tell how much of each ingredient you need to fit your family’s needs.

With the exception of dairy and Vitamin B 12, this should take care of your nutritional needs.  Maybe not all of your wants, but once you get this out of the way, you can concentrate on adding the stuff you want to your food storage knowing you have enough for a year already if you half to use it.

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