Best inexpensive foods to store

(Survival Manual/ Prepper articles/ Best  inexpensive foods to store)

RainManA.  Best Foods to Stockpile for an Emergency
29 December 2013, USCrisisPreppers.com, by Vanessa DiMaggio
Pasted from: http://www.uscrisispreppers.com/2013/12/29/best-foods-to-stockpile-for-an-emergency/

Natural disasters—a flood, hurricane, blizzard—often come with little or no warning. Stocking up now on the right nonperishable food items will help you weather the storm with less stress.

Fueling your body during an emergency is very different from your everyday diet. Because you’ll probably expend more energy than you normally would, you should eat high-energy, high-protein foods. And because you’ll have a limited supply, the higher-quality foods you eat—and the less of them—the better. “In a disaster or an emergency you want those calories,” says Barry Swanson, a food scientist at Washington State University. “You want some nutrients and some fiber—something to keep your diet normal.”

“In an emergency, generally you tend to think of meeting more basic needs than preferences and flavors,” says Elizabeth Andress, professor and food safety specialist at the University of Georgia. “But if you plan right, you can have a great variety of foods and nutrients.” Here, Andress and Swanson weigh in on what items you should include.

_1. What to Always Keep in Your Pantry
These items have lengthy expiration dates, so you can stash them away for long periods of time. Make a list of everything in your stockpile and check expiration dates every 6 to 12 months to keep things fresh. And don’t forget to have a can opener on hand at all times—all that food won’t be of any use if you can’t open it.

best food1•  Peanut butter:  A great source of energy, peanut butter is chock-full of healthful fats and protein. Unless the jar indicates otherwise, you don’t have to refrigerate after opening.

•  Whole-wheat crackers:  Crackers are a good replacement for bread and make a fine substitute when making sandwiches. Due to their higher fat content, whole-wheat or whole-grain crackers have a shorter shelf life than their plain counterparts (check the box for expiration dates), but the extra fiber pays off when you’re particularly hungry. Consider vacuum-packing your crackers to prolong their freshness.

•  Nuts and trail mixes:  Stock up on these high-energy foods—they’re healthful and convenient for snacking. Look for vacuum-packed containers, which prevent the nuts from oxidizing and losing their freshness.

•  Cereal:  Choose multigrain cereals that are individually packaged so they don’t become stale after opening.

•  Granola bars and power bars:  Healthy and filling, these portable snacks usually stay fresh for at least six months. Plus, they’re an excellent source of carbohydrates. “You can get more energy from carbohydrates without [eating] tons of food,” says Andress.

•  Dried fruits, such as apricots and raisins:  In the absence of fresh fruit, these healthy snacks offer potassium and dietary fiber. “Dried fruits provide you with a significant amount of nutrients and calories,” says Swanson.

•  Canned tuna, salmon, chicken, or turkey:  Generally lasting at least two years in the pantry, canned meats provide essential protein. Vacuum-packed pouches have a shorter shelf life but will last at least six months, says Diane Van, manager of the USDA meat and poultry hotline.

•  Canned vegetables, such as green beans, carrots, and peas:  When the real deal isn’t an option, canned varieties can provide you with essential nutrients.

•  Canned soups and chili:  Soups and chili can be eaten straight out of the can and provide a variety of nutrients. Look for low-sodium options.

•  Bottled water:  Try to stock at least a three-day supply–you need at least one gallon per person per day. “A normally active person should drink at least a half gallon of water each day,” says Andress. “The other half gallon is for adding to food and washing.”

•  Sports drinks, such as Gatorade or PowerAde:  The electrolytes and carbohydrates in these drinks will help you rehydrate and replenish fluid when water is scarce.

•  Powdered milk:  Almost all dairy products require refrigeration, so stock this substitute for an excellent source of calcium and vitamin D when fresh milk isn’t an option.

•  Sugar, salt, and pepper:  If you have access to a propane or charcoal stove, you may be doing some cooking. A basic supply of seasonings and sweeteners will improve the flavor of your food, both fresh and packaged.

•  Multivitamins
Supplements will help replace the nutrients you would have consumed on a normal diet.

What to Buy Right Before an Emergency
_2. Produce
If you’ve been given ample warning that a storm is coming, there’s still time to run to the market and pick up fresh produce and other items that have shorter shelf  lives. Most of these foods will last at least a week after they’ve been purchased and will give you a fresh alternative to all that packaged food. Make sure to swing by your local farmers’ market if it’s open; because the produce there is fresher than what you’ll find at your typical supermarket, you’ll add a few days to the life span of your fruits and vegetables.

•  Apples:  Apples last up to three months when stored in a cool, dry area away from more perishable fruits (like bananas), which could cause them to ripen more quickly.

•  Citrus fruits, such as oranges and grapefruits:  Because of their high acid content and sturdy skins, citrus fruits can last for up to two weeks without refrigeration, particularly if you buy them when they’re not fully ripe. Oranges and grapefruits contain lots of vitamin C and will keep you hydrated.

•  Avocados:  If you buy an unripe, firm avocado, it will last outside the refrigerator for at least a week.

•  Tomatoes:  If you buy them unripe, tomatoes will last several days at room temperature.

•  Potatoes, sweet potatoes, and yams:  If you have access to a working stove, these root vegetables are good keepers and make tasty side dishes. Stored in a cool, dark area, potatoes will last about a month.

•  Cucumbers and summer squash:  These vegetables will last a few days outside of refrigeration and can be eaten raw.

•  Winter squash:  While most are inedible uncooked, winter squashes, such as acorn squash, will keep for a few months. If you’ll be able to cook during the emergency, stockpile a bunch.

•  Hard, packaged sausages, such as sopressata and pepperoni:  You can’t eat canned tuna and chicken forever. Try stocking up on a few packages of dry-cured salamis like sopressata, a southern Italian specialty available at most grocery stores. Unopened, they will keep for up to six weeks in the pantry, says Van.

_3. More Food Advice for an Emergency
•  If the electricity goes out, how do you know what is and isn’t safe to eat from the refrigerator? If your food has spent more than four hours over 40º Fahrenheit, don’t eat it. As long as frozen foods have ice crystals or are cool to the touch, they’re still safe. “Once it gets to be room temperature, bacteria forms pretty quickly, and you want to be very careful about what you’re eating,” says Swanson. Keep the doors closed on your refrigerator and freezer to slow down the thawing process.

•  If you don’t have electricity, you may still be able to cook or heat your food. If you have outdoor access, a charcoal grill or propane stove is a viable option (these can’t be used indoors because of improper ventilation). If you’re stuck indoors, keep a can of Sterno handy: Essentially heat in a can, it requires no electricity and can warm up small amounts of food in cookware.

•  If your family has special needs—for example, you take medication regularly or you have a small child—remember to stock up on those essential items, too. Keep an extra stash of baby formula and jars of baby food or a backup supply of your medications.

•  If you live in an area at high risk for flooding, consider buying all your pantry items in cans, as they are less likely to be contaminated by flood waters than jars. “It’s recommended that people don’t eat home-canned foods or jarred foods that have been exposed to flood waters because those seals are not quite as intact.”
.

B.  $5 Preps – You CAN Afford to Prepare
18 May 2012, TheSurvivalMom.com, contributed by Lucas from his site SurvivalCache
Pasted from: http://thesurvivalmom.com/2010/05/18/5-dollar-preps-%E2%80%93-you-can-afford-to-prepare/

Guest Post by Lucas: aspiring survivalist/prepper, Eagle Scout, and blogger on his site Survival Cache where he writes survival gear reviews, tips, and ideas.

“I can’t afford to” is definitely the number one excuse people use for not prepping. They believe this because they read about someone who has a $20,000 dollar gun collection and a basement filled with a 10 year supply of freeze dried food. That is just as unrealistic as saying that you want to buy your first house, so you attempt to get a multi-million dollar mansion. It’s just not going to happen.

By following the Survival Food Pyramid and spending just a few dollars a week on preps you will be surprised how quickly your stockpile will grow.
Here is an entire list of food and gear you can get for just $5:

Foodbest food 5 dollars
Five gallons of purified water
4 pounds of Sugar
5 pounds of Flour [x 2=10]
1.5 quarts of cooking oil
Two cases of bottled water [x 4=8]
4 cans of fruit [x 5=20]
5 pounds of rice
5 Pounds of Spaghetti
4 Cans of Potatoes [x 4=16]
4 Cans of Vegetables [x 4=16]
4 Cans of Beans [x 4=16]
2 bottles of garlic powder or other spices
A case of Ramen noodles
Five packages of  instant potatoes
4 Cans of Soup [x 4=16]
2- 12 ounce cans of chicken or tuna [x 8=16]
Two- 12.5 ounce cans of Salmon [x 8=16]
5 pounds of Oatmeal
5 packages of corn bread mix
3 Pounds of dry beans [x 3=9]
2 Jars Peanut Butter
2 boxes of yeast
8-10 pounds of Iodized salt
A can of coffee
10 Boxes of generic brand Mac & Cheese

Non-Food Items
A manual can opener
Two bottles of camp stove fuel [x 6=12]
100 rounds of .22LR ammo [x 10=1000]
25 rounds of 12 gauge birdshot or small game loads [x 10=250]
20 rounds of .223 or 7.62ammo [x 50=1000]
a spool of 12 lb test monofilament fishing line
2 packages of hooks and some sinkers or corks
3 Bic Lighters or two big boxes of matches
A package of tea candles
50 ft of para cord [x 2=100 ft]
A roll of duct tape
A box of nails or other fasteners
A flashlight
2 D-batteries, 4 AA or AAA batteries or 2 9v batteries
A toothbrush and tooth paste
A bag of disposable razors
8 bars of ivory soap (it floats)
A box or tampons or bag of pads for the ladies
2 gallons of bleach
Needles and thread

OTC Medications
2 bottles 1000 count 500 mg generic Tylenol (acetometaphin)
2 bottles 500 count 200 mg generic advil (ibuprofen)
2 boxes 24 cound 25 mg generic Benadryl (diphenhydramine HCI)–also available at walgreens under “sleep aids.”
4 bottles 500 count Tylenol
2 boxes of generic sudafed
4 bottles of alcohol
a box of bandages (4×4)
[ ‘fish’ antibiotics]
[mosquito repellant]
[topical antibiotic]

What Else?
If you get just one of these things each time you go to the grocery you will be well on your way to preparedness. What other $5 Dollar Preps can you think of?

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Filed under Prepper articles, Survival Manual

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s