Why our weather anomalies? Ocean currents? Really?

(News & Editorial/Why our weather anomalies? Ocean currents? Really?)

 A.  Recent headlines, sometimes quietly peeping out from the news:

Historic Ice Storm Unfolds in South; Lengthy Power Outages Possible
12 February 2014, AccuWeatgher.com, by Brian Lada Meteorologist
“The event could be the worst ice storm for parts of the South in more than 10 years…In many cases, roads may be too dangerous for travel…”
See article at: http://www.accuweather.com/en/weather-news/ice-storm-begins-to-unfold-in/23186487

Ice Expert Predicts Lake Superior Will Completely Freeze Over This Winter
11 Feb 2014,  CNSNews.con, by Barbara Hollingsworth
“… an expert on Great Lakes ice says there’s a “very high likelihood” that the three-quadrillion-gallon lake will soon be totally covered with ice thanks to this winter’s record-breaking cold…”
See article at: http://cnsnews.com/news/article/barbara-hollingsworth/ice-expert-predicts-lake-superior-will-completely-freeze-over

Rare snowstorm for Japan
8 Feb 2014
A strong storm moving up the eastern coastline of Japan brought some heavy snowfall Saturday into early Sunday for areas that typically don’t see much in the way of snow.
See article at: http://local.msn.com/rare-snowstorm-for-japan-2

Western drought spells killer grocery bills
7 Feb 2014, MarketWatch.com, By Myra P. Saefong
SAN FRANCISCO — Much like the polar vortex spiked demand and prices for natural gas in the eastern U.S., another weather phenomenon — a severe drought — is threatening cattle and milk production and food crops in the West.
See article at: http://www.marketwatch.com/story/us-drought-hurts-cattle-crops-prices-heat-up-2014-02-07

Iran Snowstorm: Heaviest Snow In 50 Years Blanket Country’s North
4 February 2014, Agence France Presse, by
See article at: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/02/04/iran-snowstorm-photos_n_4718467.html?utm_hp_ref=green&ir=Green

UK floods: January rain breaks records in parts of England
30 January 2014, Met Ofc., BBC.co.uk
Parts of England have had their wettest January since records began more than 100 years ago, figures show.
See article at: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-25944823

California drought: 17 communities could run out of water within 60 to 120 days, state says
28 Jan 2014, MercuryNews.com, by Paul Rogers
See article at: http://www.mercurynews.com/science/ci_25013388/california-drought-17-communities-could-run-out-water

volcano1 egyptPolar vortex: Stressed about the cold? So is the power grid
8 Jan 2014, The Christian Science Monitor, by Nicholas Cunningham, Guest blogger
Several snow storms hit the northeast over the course of the first few days of 2014, only to be followed up by the coldest temperatures in two decades due to a surge of Arctic air descending into the U.S.
 See article at: http://www.csmonitor.com/Environment/Energy-Voices/2014/0108/Polar-vortex-Stressed-about-the-cold-So-is-the-power-grid

First snowstorm in 100 years hits Middle East
14 Dec 2013, EUTimes.net, by EU Times
 See article at: http://www.eutimes.net/2013/12/first-snowstorm-in-100-years-hits-middle-east/

 

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B.  2013 Sets A New Record For Volcanic Eruptions: Heightens The Risk Of Worldwide Cooling
5 Dec 2013, The Daily Sheeple , by Chris Carrington
Pasted from: http://www.thedailysheeple.com/2013-sets-a-new-record-for-volcanic-eruptions-heightens-the-risk-of-worldwide-cooling_122013

weather voocano a

2013 has seen more volcanic eruptions than at any time since records began. As reported in Seven Volcanoes In Six Different Countries All Start Erupting With in Hours Of Each Other, volcanism is on the increase. (see: http://www.thedailysheeple.com/volcanoes-could-usher-in-new-cold-period-say-scientists_032013 )

In an average year, 50-60 volcanoes erupt. So far this year there have been 83, not including any eruptions when writing this article.

An extra 23-33 eruptions (so far) may not seem like much, but those extra eruptions represent a massive amount of gases and ash being blown into the atmosphere. Millions and millions of metric tons which can have a profound effect on life on Earth.

The ash, which contains a variety of particulate matter, reflects sunlight back away from the surface. In severe eruptions it actually prevents sunlight getting through at all, as with the Mount Pinatubo eruption in 1992. Sulfur dioxide, one of the main gases thrown up during eruptions, also decreases temperatures and millions of tons at a time can be discharged when a volcano erupts.

If this level of volcanism continues, which at this point looks likely, then we could be heading for a drop of a couple of degrees in temperature. Again this doesn’t sound like much, but a 2°C drop is enough to alter the agricultural zone charts in some areas. Climate scientists tell us that a rise of 2°C due to anthropogenic global warming (AGW) will be a disaster for mankind, yet they never mention what a drop of 2°C can do.

The effects of such a drop would be profound, and if you add in the predicted drop in temperatures from the very long and subdued solar cycle, it looks like life is going to become very chilly indeed.

Solheim and Humlum are predicting a minimum drop of 1°C due to the solar cycle and James Marusek goes further suggesting:

We will experience temperatures that we have not seen in over 200 years, during the time of the early pioneers.

David Archibald, a climatologist, also suggests that the dip in solar activity will lower temperatures to levels we have not experienced for centuries.

Add these predictions to the effects of the volcanoes, and you have a doomsday scenario of long, bitterly cold winters and shorter, cooler summers. Crops and livestock will be affected, and famine is a real possibility, both home and abroad.

Grain stores are not full enough to last for decades of cold. The reserves would cover a year maybe two but not a decade or longer.

The Little Ice Age saw millions dying of hunger and cold, and with so many more mouths to feed now, that figure could go much higher.

Every day the global warming alarmists throw something more into the mix, some new way that positive figure climate change is going to be the death of us all. Loss of environment, loss of habitat  for a species no one has ever heard of, melting ice, rising sea levels… it’s endless.

The real and immediate danger we all face is global cooling, and with the uptick in vulcanism and the down tick in activity on the Sun, the chances are we will experience it sooner rather than later.

Yet it’s never mentioned.
•  I have never heard a politician say that we should be storing firewood and long-life foods and grains that we may not be able to grow in ten years time.
•  I have never heard a politician say ‘we are cutting green energy taxes so you can afford to insulate your homes and fit solar and PV units’.
•  I have never heard them say ‘we need to improve natural gas storage facilities and improve our electrical infrastructure so we can cope with the surge in demand that’s going to occur in the near future’.
If you have never looked at the Georgia Guidestones (see the message below, in part E of this post.)

Maintain humanity under 500,000,000 in perpetual balance with nature.
You need to think about this. You need to consider not just the usual doomsday scenarios we talk about. It’s said that if the grid goes down for good, 99% of Americans will be dead within a year. Would that figure rise if the grid goes down and we are facing bone numbing cold and famine at the same time? I suggest it would.

Sources:
http://geography.about.com/od/globalproblemsandissues/a/pinatubo.htm
http://www.thedailysheeple.com/?s=seven+volcanoes
http://www.volcanodiscovery.com/erupting_volcanoes.html
http://arxiv.org/abs/1202.1954
http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1364682612000417
http://www.space.com/11960-fading-sunspots-slower-solar-activity-solar-cycle.html
http://www.davidarchibald.info/papers/Archibald2009E&E.pdf
http://www.jstor.org/discover/10.2307/203063?uid=3738032&uid=2129&uid=2&uid=70&uid=4&sid=21103062439911

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C.  22 Signs That Global Weather Patterns Are Going Absolutely Crazy
4 June 2013, EndOfTheAmericandream.com, by Michael
Pasted from: http://endoftheamericandream.com/archives/22-signs-that-global-weather-patterns-are-going-absolutely-crazy

weather floodingGlobal weather patterns seem to get stranger and stranger with each passing year.  Almost every day now, the news is telling us about some bizarre weather event that hasn’t happened “in 100 years” going on in some area of the globe.  All over the planet, we are seeing torrential rainfalls, unprecedented flooding, extreme drought, nightmarish wildfires, record setting tornadoes and very unusual blizzards.  Record high temperatures and record low temperatures are set so frequently now that nobody really seems to even notice anymore.  So exactly what in the world is going on here?  Why does our weather seem to be going absolutely crazy?  Perhaps even more important – can we expect our weather patterns to become even more erratic?  Some meteorologists are suggesting that these unusual weather events are just an “anomaly” and that things will get back to normal soon.  But what if they don’t?

I noted that natural disasters seem to be increasing in both frequency and severity in my recent article entitled “Are We Entering The Worst Period For Natural Disasters In U.S. History?“  But it isn’t just the ground under our feet that seems to be becoming more unstable.  The weather patterns that we all take for granted and that society depends upon seem to be rapidly changing.

The following are 22 signs that global weather patterns are going absolutely crazy…

1. Right now, central Europe is experiencing the worst flooding that it has seen in at least 70 years.

2. On Memorial Day weekend, a vicious winter storm dumped up to 36 inches of snow on parts of upstate New York.

3. Back in mid-May, on one single day some parts of the UK had a couple of inches of snow, some parts of the UK had a month’s worth of rainfall on a single day, and some parts of the UK were hammered by winds of up to 65 miles per hour.

4. The month of April (2013) was so cold across the northern United States that one meteorologist said that it was “like something out of the Twilight Zone“…

April has been a freakishly cold month across much of the northern USA, bringing misery to millions of sun-starved and winter-weary residents from the Rockies to the Midwest. “The weather map … looks like something out of The Twilight Zone,” Minneapolis meteorologist Paul Douglas of WeatherNation TV wrote on his blog last week. Record cold and snow has been reported in dozens of cities, with the worst of the chill in the Rockies, upper Midwest and northern Plains. Several baseball games have been snowed out in both Denver and Minneapolis. Cities such as Rapid City, S.D.; Duluth, Minn.; and Boulder, Colo., have all endured their snowiest month ever recorded. (In all three locations, weather records go back more than 100 years.) In fact, more than 1,100 snowfall records and 3,400 cold records have been set across the nation so far in April, according to the National Climatic Data Center.

5. This year Saskatchewan had the coolest spring that it has experienced in 100 years.

6. Moscow just experienced the snowiest winter that it has seen in 100 years.

7. Snow is falling in Russia in places where it should not be falling this time of the year.  On Sunday, residents of Kemerovo were stunned to see that a thin layer of snow had fallen on their city overnight.

8. This spring, there was a record amount of ice on the Baltic Sea due to very cold weather…
“Since record keeping began in the sixties, we’ve never encountered anything like this before,” ice breaker Ulf Gulldne told the local newspaper Örnsköldsviks Allehanda.
On March 29th, 176,000 square kilometers of the Baltic Sea was covered in ice, a record for the time of year. On a map, it means about half of the central and northern parts are frozen over. Far north, the ice is both thick and difficult to break through.

9. The city of Anchorage, Alaska set a record for the longest snow season that it has ever experienced this year.

10. In February, hail the size of “boulders” pounded one poor city in southern India
Hailstones the size of boulders have rained down on villages in southern India.
At least nine people were killed when the violent weather hit several villages in the state of Andhra Pradesh.
The hailstorm which lasted for almost 20 minutes, destroyed crops, houses and live stock, causing devastating financial implications for residents.

11. The tornado that touched down near Oklahoma City on Friday was the widest tornado ever recorded.  It was an EF5 tornado that was 2.6 miles wide at one point with winds of up to 295 miles an hour.

12. The tornado that did such devastating damage to Moore, Oklahoma recently was about 2 miles wide and it sat on the ground for an astounding 40 minutes.

13. During the month of February, Peru, Chile and Bolivia were all hit by unprecedented flooding.

14. At the end of May, more than a foot of rainfall in 24 hours caused nightmarish flooding in San Antonio, Texas.

15. A few weeks ago, unusual levels of rainfall caused the Mississippi River to rise to near record levels.

16. This year the state of Georgia experienced the wettest February ever recorded.

17. Chicago just had the wettest April ever recorded.

18. Scientists are projecting that the nightmarish drought that is taking place in the western half of the United States will “intensify” this year.

19. Overall, hundreds of thousands of trees died throughout the United States during 2012 due to horrible drought conditions.

20. This past January, part of Australia experienced record setting high temperatures that were absolutely unprecedented.  Keep in mind that the following temperatures are in Celsius…
Sydney endured its hottest ever day on Friday, with records smashed across the city and thousands of people suffering from the heat.  The mercury topped 45.8 at Sydney’s Observatory Hill at 2.55pm, breaking the previous record set in 1939 by half a degree. The city’s highest temperature was a scorching 46.5 degrees, recorded in Penrith at 2.15pm, while Camden, Richmond and Sydney Airport all reached 46.4 degrees.

21. Over the weekend, extremely dry conditions were making it difficult for firefighters to battle a very intense wildfire in California that had already burned more than 20,000 acres
By Sunday night, the Powerhouse Fire around the Angeles National Forest in Southern California engulfed about 22,400 acres, endangering some 1,000 homes in the Lake Elizabeth and Lake Hughes area.
Nearly 2,100 firefighters struggled to contain the fire, which more than tripled in size from Saturday to Sunday. Nearly 3,000 people have been evacuated and the blaze has already destroyed at least six homes by Sunday night.

22. About 30 percent of all honeybees are dying each year in the United States, and nobody seems to know exactly why this is happening.  If this continues, it threatens to absolutely cripple U.S. agriculture…
US honey bees have been dying by the tens of millions, with annual death rates of about 30 percent. With fewer bees to pollinate fruits and vegetables each year, ‘beemageddon’ may soon cause the collapse of the agriculture industry.
Honey bees pollinate more than 100 US crops, including apples, zucchinis, avocados and plums, that are worth more than $200 billion a year. Since 2006, about 10 million bee hives at an average value of $200 each have been lost in what scientists call the Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD), according to a new report by the US Department of Agriculture.

We certainly don’t need any more bad news about our agriculture.  Global food supplies are currently at their lowest level in 40 years, and most people in the general public are absolutely clueless about what is going on.
Unfortunately, our weather has not just been unusual for the past few months.  This is a trend that has been developing for quite some time
For example, the planet experienced some truly unusual weather last winter.  The following comes from a New York Times article from last January…

Around the world, extreme has become the new commonplace.
Especially lately. China is enduring its coldest winter in nearly 30 years. Brazil is in the grip of a dreadful heat spell. Eastern Russia is so freezing — minus 50 degrees Fahrenheit, and counting — that the traffic lights recently stopped working in the city of Yakutsk.

Bush fires are raging across Australia, fueled by a record-shattering heat wave. Pakistan was inundated by unexpected flooding in September. A vicious storm bringing rain, snow and floods just struck the Middle East. And in the United States, scientists confirmed this week what people could have figured out simply by going outside: last year was the hottest since records began.

Indeed, “extreme has become the new commonplace” as far as our weather is concerned.
So will our weather get back to “normal” soon or are even greater changes ahead?
And what in the world is causing all of this?

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D.  Volcanic Aerosols Tamped Down Recent Surface Warming
11 Mar 2013, ThinkProgress.org, By Climate Guest Blogger
Pasted from: http://thinkprogress.org/climate/2013/03/11/1698211/volcanic-aerosols-tamped-down-recent-surface-warming/?mobile=nc

The last decade was the hottest on record. And the data make clear the planet is still warming, despite deniers’ disinformation to the contrary. But a new study does explain one reason surface temperatures did not rise quite as much as scientists expected in the past decade – JR.

weather volcano bEyjafjallajokull volcano    CIRES News Release

In the search for clues as to why Earth did not warm as much as scientists expected between 2000 and 2010, researchers have discovered the answer is hiding in plain sight. The study, led by a scientist from NOAA’s Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences (CIRES), showed that dozens of volcanoes spewing sulfur dioxide have tempered the warming.

The findings essentially shift the focus away from Asia, including India and China, two countries that are estimated to have increased their industrial sulfur dioxide emissions by about 60 percent from 2000 to 2010 through coal burning, said lead author Ryan Neely, a CIRES scientist working at NOAA’s Earth System Research Laboratory. Small amounts of sulfur dioxide emissions from Earth’s surface eventually rise 12 to 20 miles into the stratospheric aerosol layer of the atmosphere, where chemical reactions create sulfuric acid and water particles that reflect sunlight back to space, cooling the planet.

Neely said previous observations suggest that increases in stratospheric aerosols since 2000 have counterbalanced as much as 25 percent of the warming scientists attribute to human greenhouse gas emissions. “This new study indicates it is emissions from small to moderate volcanoes that have been slowing the warming of the planet,” said Neely.

A paper on the subject was published online in Geophysical Research Letters, a publication of the American Geophysical Union. Co-authors include Professors Brian Toon and Jeffrey Thayer from CU-Boulder; Susan Solomon, a former NOAA scientist now at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Jean Paul Vernier from NASA’s Langley Research Center in Hampton, Va.; Christine Alvarez, Karen Rosenlof and John Daniel from NOAA; and Jason English, Michael Mills and Charles Bardeen from the National Center for Atmospheric Research in Boulder.

The new study relies on long-term measurements of changes in the stratospheric aerosol layer’s “optical depth,” which is a measure of transparency, said Neely.  Since 2000, the optical depth in the stratospheric aerosol layer has increased by about 4 to 7 percent, meaning it is slightly more opaque now than in previous years.

“The biggest implication here is that scientists need to pay more attention to small and moderate volcanic eruptions when trying to understand changes in Earth’s climate,” said Toon of CU-Boulder’s Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences. Overall these eruptions are not going to counter the human caused greenhouse warming, he said.  “Emissions of volcanic gases go up and down, helping to cool or heat the planet, while greenhouse gas emissions from human activity just continue to go up.”

The key to the new results was the combined use of two sophisticated computer models, including the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model, or WACCM, Version 3, developed by NCAR and which is widely used around the world by scientists to study the atmosphere.  The team coupled WACCM with a second model, the Community Aerosol and Radiation Model for Atmosphere, or CARMA, which allows researchers to calculate properties of specific aerosols and which has been under development by a team led by Toon for the past several decades.

Neely said the team used the Janus supercomputer on (the CU) campus to conduct seven computer “runs,” each simulating 10 years of atmospheric activity tied to both coal-burning activities in Asia and to emissions by volcanoes around the world. Each run took about a week of computer time using 192 processors, allowing the team to separate coal-burning pollution in Asia from aerosol contributions from moderate, global volcanic eruptions. The project would have taken a single computer processor roughly 25 years to complete, said Neely.

The scientists said 10-year climate data sets like the one gathered for the new study are not long enough to determine climate change trends. “This paper addresses a question of immediate relevance to our understanding of the human impact on climate,” said Neely. “It should interest those examining the sources of decadal climate variability, the global impact of local pollution and the role of volcanoes.”

While small and moderate volcanoes mask some of the human-caused warming of the planet, larger volcanoes can have a much bigger effect, said Toon. When Mount Pinatubo in the Philippines erupted in 1991, it emitted millions of tons of sulfur dioxide into the atmosphere that cooled the Earth slightly for the next several years.

The research for the new study was funded in part through a NOAA/ ESRL-CIRES Graduate Fellowship to Neely.  The National Science Foundation and NASA also provided funding for the research project.  The Janus supercomputer is supported by NSF and CU-Boulder and is a joint effort of CU-Boulder, CU Denver and NCAR.

.weather GA guidestones 

E. The Georgia Guidestones
A message consisting of a set of ten guidelines or principles is engraved on the Georgia Guidestones in eight different languages, one language on each face of the four large upright stones (see photograph of the face with the English version right). Moving clockwise around the structure from due north, these languages are: English, Spanish, Swahili, Hindi, Hebrew, Arabic, Chinese and Russian.

  1. Maintain humanity under 500,000,000 in perpetual balance with nature.
  2. Guide reproduction wisely — improving fitness and diversity.
  3. Unite humanity with a living new language.
  4. Rule passion — faith — tradition — and all things with tempered reason.
  5. Protect people and nations with fair laws and just courts.
  6. Let all nations rule internally resolving external disputes in a world court.
  7. Avoid petty laws and useless officials.
  8. Balance personal rights with social duties.
  9. Prize truth — beauty — love — seeking harmony with the infinite.
  10. Be not a cancer on the earth — Leave room for nature — Leave room for nature.
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