Category Archives: __1. 1620 Mayflower lineage

Howland, Chipman, Horney, Anderson, Grubb, Pierce

John Chipman Jr. (Hon.) and Mary Skiff

(The Pilgrims & Skiff branch)

John CHIPMAN  Hon. was born on 3 Mar 1670 in Barnstable, Barnstable, MA; died on 4 Jan 1756 in New Port, New Port, RI; buried in New Port, New Port, RI. [John Chipman Jr. was son of Hope Howland and grandson of Pilgrim John Howland]

John CHIPMAN married Mary SKIFF in 1691 in MA. They had the following children: James CHIPMAN (b. 18 Dec 1694), John CHIPMAN (b. 18 Sep 1697), Mary (twin) CHIPMAN (b. 11 Dec 1699), Bethia (twin) CHIPMAN (b. 11 Dec 1699), ♥ Perez CHIPMAN (b. 28 Sep 1702), Deborah CHIPMAN (b. 6 Dec 1704), Stephen (twin) CHIPMAN (b. 9 Jun 1708), Lydia (twin) CHIPMAN (b. 9 Jun 1708), Ebenezer CHIPMAN (b. 13 Nov 1709).

He also married Elizabeth (Russel) (Pope) HANDLEY in 1716 at Capt. Popes home, Dartmouth, MA. They had the following children: Handley CHIPMAN* (b.31 Aug 1717), Rebecca CHIPMAN (b.10 Nov 1719). *See {D4} below.

He also married Hannah (Huxley) (Griffin) CASE in 1725 inNewport,RI.

BIRTH:  17 May 1708 John Chipman is listed in his father’s Will to receive real-estate in Barnstable, MA.{D1}

PHYSICAL APPEARANCE: John’s son, Handley, by second wife, Elizabeth describes his father, saying, “My dear Father was a tall Person…my dear fathers hair reddish and he of Light complection..”{D4} [See below Handley’s brief biography of his family includinhg elder John Chipman.

MARRIAGE:
1. John 1st married, Mary Skiff, about 1691: to their union were born nine children including, James, John, Mary, Bethia, Perez, Deborah, Stephen, Lydia, and Ebenezer. Mary and Bethia, also Stephen and Lydia were twins. Mary died on 12 March 1711.{D2} The family lived in Sandwich, Barnstable, MA.

2. In 1716, John married the widowed Elizabeth Handley Pope Russell: their union produced two children, Handley and Rebecca. After continuing to live several more years at Sandwich, John moved the family to Martha’s Vineyard, where they lived for seven years before Elizabeth Handley died.  Elizabeth became very ill while visiting her ex father-in-law Captain Pope in Dartmouth and died 4-5 months later, at his residence, after a long bout with Consumption. John and Elizabeth’s son, Handley, writes, “My Dear Father used to go back and forward to Visit her until about the 30 day of Jany A.D. 1725 when she departed this Life…”{D4}

The Will of Seth Pope of Dartmouthdated 1 April 1720, names “my former daughter in law now wife of Lewt John Chipman of Sandwich” and her son Handy Chipman.{D2}

3. On his last trip to visit Elizabeth before she died, John met the widow Hannah Case. Mrs. Case had just buried her husband on Martha’s Vineyard and returning to the mainland. The two took the ferry and traveled together on one horse, both going in the same direction to Dartsmouth.{D4}

About a year later, in 1725, at 55 of years of age, John married the widow Hannah Huxley Griffin Case.{D2} Soon after remarrying, John sold his property on Martha’s Vineyard and moved to Rhode Island “and Let his money to interest, but it depreciating fast, he called it in and went to shopkeeping.” {D4}

LIVELIHOOD:
While living in Sandwich John had been a coroner, Lieutenant, Captain, and a Representative to the General Assembly at Boston.

While he lived on Martha’s Vineyard he was a Justice of the Peace and one of the Judges of the Inferior Court.{D4}

“In MA he was a magistrate, a member of the general court, a justice of the Court of Common Pleas, 1772. In RI, where he lived after 1727, he was first of six Associates of that colony who with the other Associates, the Governor and Philip Cortland and Daniel Horsemanden of the NY council, was a member of the Commissioners of Review appointed by royal authority, who met at Norwich, CT and decided Connecticut’s course toward the Indians.”{D3}

“About age 70 years old when he of choice flung up all offices by reason of his old age, and soon after my Mother in Law dying  (Hannah Case) he left off his Shopkeeping, broke up housekeeping, and went to live with my own sister (Rebecca) who had married a worthy person, a Capy Moore…”{D4}
When daughter, Rebecca, died a few years later, John went to live with his son Handley. He was given a room and kept company. “Loosing his Last wife, and Living very retire in a room much by himself, as was his own Choice, keeping his Books of Divinity by him, and pipe and Tobacco, he soon grew rater dull, and rather Melancholy, inclined to have but Little Company or Conversation, nor could he be persuaded but Seldom, to Eat any of his Meals out of his own room, where he always had a fire to himself and one or other of the family that attended upon him…”{D4}

WILL:  In his Will dated 17 Oct 1749, John Chipman mentions his sons Perces (Perez) and Handley and others in the family.{D2}

John Chipman Jr. died leaving 70 children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren behind him.

DOCUMENTS:
1. The Mayflower Descendant, Vol. III, article Elder John Chipman’s Will and Inventory, p. 181. Recorded in the Barnstable County Probate Records, Vol. III, pages 228-231.
2. “Mayflower Families In Progress – Richard Warren…”, published by General Society of Mayflower
Descendants, 1987, p. 84.
3. The Chipman Family: A Genealogy of the Chipmans In America 1631-1920 by Bert Lee Chipman, 1920, Winston -Salem, NC.
4.  A Chipman Family History by Handley Chipman (1717-1799) of Newport, RI and Cornwallis, Nova Scotia. Reproduced and printed by “The New England Historical and Genealogical Register”,
1937 Vol. XCI, Publ by the Society at the Robert Henry Eddy Memorial Rooms,Boston.
* Individual source: The Chipman Family: A Genealogy of the Chipmans In America 1631-1920 by Bert Lee Chipman, 1920, Winston -Salem, NC.

Mary  SKIFF was born on 13 Nov 1671 in Sandwich, Barnstable, MA; died on 12 Mar 1711 in Sandwich, Barnstable, MA; buried in Sandwich, Barnstable,MA. Parents, Stephen Skeffe and Lydia Snow, descendant from 1620 Mayflower ancestor Richard Warren..

When Marcy died in 1711, she left her husband to care for nine children between the ages of 2 and 17 years of age.

* Individual source: The Chipman Family: A Genealogy of the Chipmans In America
1631-1920
 by Bert Lee Chipman, 1920, Winston -Salem, NC.
* Individual source: Mayflower Families In Progress: Richard Warren of the Mayflower and His Descendants for Four Generations, compiled by Robert S. Wakefield and others, Published by
General Society of Mayflower Descendants, 1987.

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A brief history of the Chipman family written by Handley Chipman, son of  John Chipman (Jr) Hon., and his 2nd wife Elizabeth Handley Pope Russell

“[The Mayflower pilgrims] … saw them the vessel after the boat’s return came up to the place of their intended settlement and they all landed and prepared huts for to live in, but poor distressed souls they being disappointed of other vessels coming over to them for a great while to supply them with provisions and other necessities as expected

“Sundry of these poor distressed people died and all was in imanent danger of perishing, if it had not been for the Clams they found on the shores and dugg up at low tide, but it was especially from the Supp & turkeys obtained in quantities [from] the native Indians … which corn they ate and paid the Indians for the spring after as soon as they had gained acquaintance with them who had been very shy of them.

“My said Grandfather (elder) John Chipman  born 1615 Married a Daughter of the aforesaid Mr. Howland and settled at Barnstable, the next Town but one which is Sandwich, to their Said Plimouth further on the Said Cape Cod, Plimouth being being at the head of the Bay.  he my Said Grandfather was an Elder in Minister Russels Congregational Church, in said Barnstable, and if I am not mistaken removed and lived in Said Sandwich the Latter part of his Day.  He died aged 88.  He had or left 10 children of which my honored father was the Youngest.  his children generally lived to grow up and Marry and from whom proceeded a very Numerous offspring.  As my Grandfather was the only one of the name of Chipman and my Grandmother Daughter of the only one of the name of Howland in New England or any of the now States of America, so the Chipmans are all on this Continent Related as well as the Howlands, and are all of them by reason of my Grandfather and grandmothers Marriage together Related to one another, and so near that Long Since my Remembrance my dear father and the Howlands used to call Cuzzens and the Howlands was often conversant at my house and my fathers house &c.

“My Dear and Honored Deceased father John Chipman, married one Capt. Skiffs daughter of said Sandwich, by whom he had 9 children that all Lived to grow up to the years of Men and Women, from whom has sprang a very large offspring.  Their names were Sons, James, Perez, John, Ebenezer and Stephen.  The Daughters names were Bethia and Mary, twins, as was also the Son Said Stephen with the next daughter Lidia, the others name was Deborah.  They had all entered into the Marriage State and had generally Large families of Children, Except said Stephen, who had no Children by his wife, Dying Master of a Vessel young in Nevis in the West Indies.  They were mostly of more than middling size.  James was a clothier by Trade, Perez was a Blacksmith as was also Ebenezer, John was a farmer and Stephen a cooper by trade.  They scattered much in their Settling in families.

“My dear fathers first wife dying at said Sandwich, Leaving said nine children, He some time after, it may be two years, married her that was my dear Mother, at Capt. Popes at Dartmouth, her first husband was his oldest Son, her second husband was one Capt. Russel, with whom I have been told She lived about 17 months, at Rhode Island or near there about….  She had no Child or Children that Lived by Either of these husbands.  by my dear father She had my Self, her son Handley, and my dear sister Rebecca.  Soon after her birth my dear Father removed from Sandwich to Martha Vineyard, where he lived it may be 7 years.

“Just about a year after my dear Mothers Death, my dear Father married the Said widow Case at Newport on Said Rhode Island.  She had had two husbands, one a Griffin, the other said Capt. Case.  by said Griffin She had a daughter who lived to grow up and Married my Said dear father Son Stephen, who died in Said West Indies Leaving no Child.  My Mother in Law’s maiden name was Mary Hoockey, and after my dear father had Lived with her 19 years She died also with the Consumption.  She was a Baptist.  My dear father soon after he thus Married at Rhode Island, sold his farm at the Vineyard, to one Mr. Norton for L1200, money then at s5/pr. ounce.  he removed then to Rhode Island and Let his money to Interest, but it depreciating fast, he called it in and went to shopkeeping.

“He was when he lived at Sandwich, Crowner or Coroner, a Capt. Lieutenant, and a Representative to the General Assembly at Boston, as I find, by his Commission Left.  While he lived on the Vineyard he was Justice of the Peace and one of the Judges of the Inferior Court, &c.

“After he removed to Rhode Island Government, he was for some time the first of the Governors Council, and was also Chief Judge of the Superior Court or court of Equity, as it was then called, and continued in said office until he was about 70 years old when he of choice flung up all offices by reason of his old age, and soon after my Mother in Law dying he Left off his Shopkeeping, broke up housekeeping, and went to live with my own Sister who had married a worthy person, a Capt. Moore.

“My dear and Honoured Father was born March 3d day, A.D. 1670.  He departed this Life at Newport on Rhode Island, January 4 th day, 1756, in my house, where he had lived some years, after he broke up housekeeping, he went and Lived at Capt. David Moors as aforesaid who married my own only Sister, but she dying in a few years after, he then came to Live with me.

“I would before I conclude the Pedigree of my dear fathers family just mention that I have divers times inquired after the family of the Chipmans coat of arms but never could get Intelligence of it.  And am lately informed that Ward Chipman, Esq. Solisiter General in our Neighboring Province of Brunswick Government, when he was in England a few years past, made very thorough Search after our family coat of arms, and finds we have none at all, &c.

“But the Chipmans in America are very Numerous indeed.  they are, we are, Sure all related, for they are all of them descended from my said Grandfather.  we find they are Spread even from Canso * Eastward to Virginia Westward, if not farther both ways.”

* A fishing village on the eastern tip of mainland Nova Scotia.

[“A Chipman Family History,” by Handley Chipman (1717-1799) of Newport, R.I., and Cornwallis, Nova Scotia, composed ca. 1790, in:

Roberts, Gary Boyd; ed.  (1985).  Genealogies of Mayflower Families From The New England Historical and Genealogical Register Volume I Adams-Fuller.  Baltimore:  Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc.

Handley Chipman’s statement validates the Chipmans of Virginia as authentic descendants of John and Hope (Howland) Chipman, but supporting documentation still needs to be assembled.]

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John Chipman (elder) and Hope Howland

(Pilgrims families & Chipman branch)

John CHIPMAN, elder, was born in 1614 in Bryan’s-Piddle, near Dorchester, England; died on 7 Apr 1708 in Sandwich, Barnstable, MA; buried in Sandwich, Barnstable,MA.

John CHIPMAN married Hope HOWLAND in 1646. They had the following children: Samuel CHIPMAN  Deacon (b. 15 Apr 1661), ♥ John CHIPMAN  Hon. (b. 3 Mar 1670), Elizabeth CHIPMAN (b.24 Jun 1647), Hope CHIPMAN (b. 31 Aug 1652), Lydia CHIPMAN (b. 25 Dec 1654), Hannah CHIPMAN (b. 14 Jan 1658), Ruth CHIPMAN (b. 31 Dec 1663), Bethia CHIPMAN (b. 1 Jul 1666), Mercy CHIPMAN (b. 6 Feb 1668), Desire CHIPMAN (b. 26 Feb 1673).

He also married Ruth SARGENT in 1684.

TRAVEL: Brotherless and early left fatherless, John sailed from Barnstable, Devon Co., England, in May 1631, on the Friendship, arriving in Boston, 14 July 1631.
John was the first and only one of the name, Chipman, in this country, and until 1850 there was no Chipman in this country who was not descended from him.{D2}

MARRIAGE: He first married Hope Howland, when she died, he secondly married Ruth Sargent. John Chipman lists his living children in his Will, dated 12 Nov 1702. {D1}{D2}

LIVELIHOOD: John was a carpenter and deputy.{D5} Also, “John Chipman was for successive years a selectman, then in Plymouth Colony invested with the authority of a magistrate, and was often a deputy of the court; and he with three assistants was designated to frequent the early Quaker meetings and ‘endeavor to reduce them from the errors of their wayes’.”

HOME: Plymouth in 1637, Yarmouth in 1647, and Barnstable in 1649.{D5} The elder John Chipman family homestead was located near the Barnstable Custom House. His son, Samuel, built the “Chipman Tavern” on the homestead, which then continued in the line of his prosperity until 1830.{D2}

RELIGION: On 30 Jun 1653, John joined his wife (Hope Howland) in becoming a member of the church at Barnstable. He became an Elder in Minister Russel’s Congregational Church at Barnstable.{D4}

HISTORICAL NOTE: John Chipman, son-in-law of John Howland and Elizabeth Tilley signed his name (at age 58) to a Bond of Administration on the John Howland estate, dated 5 March 1672, see also Elizabeth Tilley notes. {D3}

DEATH John died at 88 years of age.{D4}

WILL: The Will of John Chipman, dated 12 Nov 1702, proved 17 May 1708, mentions his second wife Ruth and the children listed herein. An excerpt from the Will states, “It I Will and Bequeath to my Two Sons Sam and John my Whole Estate in Barnstable to them and theirs for Ever: that is to Say: That my Son Samuell shall have Two parts Thereof & my Son Jno one part or third thereof. unless my son Sam see Cause to pay his brother John seventy pounds in Lew of Sd Third part. and Samuel So Doing shall Enjoy the whole he and his heirs for Ever…” An inventory of personal belonging follows in the
article.{D1}

DOCUMENTS:
1. The Mayflower Descendant, Vol. III, article Elder John Chipman’s Will and Inventory, p 181; recorded in the Barnstable County Probate Records, Vol. III, pages 228-231.
2. The Chipman Family: A Genealogy of the Chipmans In America 1631-1920 by Bert Lee Chipman, Bert L. Chipman, Publisher, Winston -Salem,NC.
3. John Chipman’s autograph shown in “The Mayflower Descendant”, Vol. XIII, April 1911, article An Autograph of Elizabeth (Tilley) Howland, p. 65.
4. A Chipman Family History by Handley Chipman (1717-1799) of Newport, RI and Cornwallis, Nova Scotia. Reproduced and printed by “The New England Historical and Genealogical Register”, 1937 Vol. XCI, Publ. by the Society at the Robert Henry Eddy Memorial Rooms,Boston.
5.  Founders of Early American Families: Emigrants from Europe 1607-1657, by Meredith B. Colket, Jr. and others, 1975, publ by the General Court of the Order of Founders and Patriots in America, located in LDS Genealogical Library, 500 S. Langley, Tuscon, AZ.
* Individual source: The Chipman Family: A Genealogy of the Chipmans In America 1631-1920 by Bert Lee Chipman, 1920, Winston -Salem, NC.

Hope HOWLAND was born on 30 Aug 1629 in Plymouth, MA; died ABT 8 Jan 1683 in Barnstable, Barnstable, MA; buried in Lothrop Hill Burying Ground, Barnstable, MA.

MARRIAGE: Hope Howland, daughter of John Howland and Elizabeth Tilley married (the Elder) John Chipman.{D1}

HOME:  In 1637 Plymouth Colony authorized the creation of three new settlements on Cape Cod, including; Sandwich, Barnstable and Yarmouth. Because the population of Plymouth Colony was too small to occupy the new settlements, outsiders were allowed, if they met some prudent conditions: 1) There could be no absentee land ownership, 2) persons “unfitt for church societe” were excluded, 3) individuals who were acceptable had to be “of good note.” A group migrated from Scituate to Barnstable led by John Lothrop, minister, and consisting primarily of his church members. Among them, or following very soon afterwards, were some early Plymouth residents, including two daughters of Pilgrim John Howland: Hope Howland with her husband John Chipman and family; also sister Desire Howland with her husband John Gorman and family, moved from Yarmouth to Barnstable.{D2}

BURIAL:  Hope died at Barnstable, MA. Her gravestone, which states, “interred ye body of Mrs. Hope Chipman, wife of Elder John Chipman”, is still standing in the old Lothrop Hill cemetery. Directions to Lothrop Hill cemetery: Go a mile or so west of Barnstable Center, MA., on Main Street, also known as Cape Cod’s Route 6A.{D1}
Lothrop Hill Burying Ground is on shady, rolling terrain located one half mile from the harbor. It is good to be remembered with a monument, because, “who have no memorial; who are perished as though they had never been.”{Ecclesiastics 44,9}

DOCUMENTS:
1. The Chipman Family: A Genealogy of the Chipmans In America 1631-1920 by Bert Lee Chipman, Bert L. Chipman, Publisher, Winston -Salem, NC.
2. The Mayflower Quarterly, Feb 1993, Vol. 59, “Pilgrim Suburbs On Cape Cod”, page 30-32.
Individual source: The Chipman Family: A Genealogy of the Chipmans In America 1631-1920 by Bert Lee Chipman, 1920, Winston -Salem,NC.

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Pilgrim Suburbs on Cape Cod
by Robert Thompson The Decision to  Expand to the Eastward 1637 – 1657.

Although Cape Cod was where Pilgrims first trod on American soil, the Cape remained virtually uninhabited, except by Indians, for the next seventeen years. The Pilgrims simply had not found the Cape sufficiently attractive for their settlement

But then about 1637, the Colony government suddenly reached back along the Cape, authorizing creation of three new settlements: Sandwich, Barnstable, and Yarmouth … This seemingly strange circumstance was the product of several factors: First, the Bay Colony on the Pilgrims’ northern exposure had grown tremendously – eclipsing the very modest growth of their own colony – thus
looming as a competitive threat to their own survival and potential prosperity.
Second, a “use it or lose it” perception emerged as a recognition of this situation; for Cape Cod was not only major coastal property but represented a significant portion of Colony land.
Third, since the population of Plymouth itself was deemed insufficient to render a viable migration and occupation of the entire Cape, it seemed necessary to allow outsiders to come in – subject, however to some prudent “conditions”.

Some of the “conditions” that were laid down: 1)  there could be no absentee land ownership, 2)  persons “unfitt for church societe” were excluded, and, 3) those individuals who were acceptable had to be persons “of good note”.

Some sixty families were involved with the migration from Saugus to Sandwich. The settlers were joined by some Plymouth and Duxbury residents, such as William Bassett Jr., James (Skiff) Skeffe … Names of Mayflower passengers are conspicuously absent. …
The early settlers of Sandwich roosted along the north shore facing Cape Cod Bay. They were allowed sections of upland to build on and sections of salt marsh for haying.

The group that migrated from Scituate to Barnstable was led by John Lothrop, minister, and consisted primarily of his church members. Among them, or very soon thereafter, were some early Plymouth residents, including the younger Samuel Fuller – Mayflower passenger -who married Lothrop’s daughter Jane. Other Barnstable residents with strong Pilgrim connection included Matthew Fuller, Samuel’s brother, and Thomas Hinkley, destined to become a colony governor: ♥ Hope Howland, daughter of Mayflower passenger John Howland and wife of John Chipman;  Desire Howland, Hope’s sister and wife of John Gorham: both families coming here from Yarmouth.

A few years after the initiation of settlements at Sandwich, Barnstable, and Yarmouth, many of the people back in Plymouth began to think about moving their town, en masse, to some other location –
having noted limitations of the land they occupied and the satisfaction of those who had moved already. Further, it became apparent that the continued migration trickle from Plymouth was eroding the Church. Many meetings were held and a committee finally appointed to study the feasibility of moving the town to a tract on the further reaches of the Cape known as Nauset. The committee reported back that a move was inadvisable because of the remoteness of the area and insufficient room for expansion. The idea of a move was then abandoned. But members of the committee went ahead and purchased land from the Nauset Indians anyway and most eventually moved there! The new town was named Eastham.

Among those who purchased land was Thomas Prence, … Nicholas Snow – family names which appear frequently in lines of descent from Mayflower passengers.

There remained a large tract between Yarmouth and Eastham which had been reserved for eventual division among the “old comers” – persons who had come from England on the first three ships.
In 1653 those who still retained rights picked up their options and a committee proceeded to lay out lots in a small portion of the area. The individuals included William Bradford, Thomas Prence,
John Howland, Nicholas Snow, William Collier, … Then for the next forty-one years there was both expansion and a great churning of properties as result of sale and resale, subdividing and re dividing, and endless land disputes. Finally, in 1694 the whole area was incorporated and given
the name Harwich. Taken from The Mayflower Quarterly, Feb. 1993, Vol.
59, No., page 30 -32.

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John Howland & Elizabeth Tilley: 1620 Pilgrims

Family Line A: The Pilgrims

* John HOWLAND was born ABT 1592 in Fenstanton, Huntingdonshire, England; died on 23 Feb 1672 in Plymouth, Plymouth, MA; buried in Old Burial Hill, Plymouth, Plymouth, MA.

John HOWLAND married Elizabeth TILLEY BEF 1624 in Plymouth, MA. They had the following children: Joseph HOWLAND Captain, Isaac HOWLAND Ensign, Elizabeth HOWLAND, Lydia HOWLAND, Desire HOWLAND (b. BEF 1627), John HOWLAND Lieut. (b. BEF 1627), Jabez HOWLAND Lieut. (b. 1628), ♥ Hope HOWLAND (b. 30 Aug 1629), Ruth HOWLAND.

HISTORICAL NOTE: The Howland family began with Bishop Howland, who performed the obsequies for Mary, Queen of Scots. Queen Elizabeth granted the Howland family their Coat of Armor in 1584.{D7}
Huntingdonshire (or Fenstanton), in southern England was John’s hometown.{D8} {D12}
John Howland, who was born about 1592, came to the New World as a servant of John Carver. Since there is no record of Howland’s residence in Leyden, he is credited to London for the reason that Carver was in England for some considerable time before the sailing of the Mayflower and undoubtedly obtained the services of Howland in that city prior to departure.{D1}
John Carver came with his wife, Catherine Desire Minter, two men servants (John Howland and Roger Wilder), a maid servant and a boy (William Latham). Carver is believed to have been the son of Robert Carver and to have been baptized 9 Sep 1565, at Doncaster, Yorkshire, Eng., which is approx. 7 miles from Austerfield and next to Bently. Humility and benevolence were eminent traits in his character.{D3}

TRAVEL: While enroute to the New World the Mayflower was caught in several severe storms. During one storm, Bradford records: “…In sundrie of these stormes the winds were so feirce, and seas so high, as they could not beare a knote of saile, but were forced to hull, for diverce days togither. And in one of them, as they thus lay at hull, in a mighty storme, a lustie yonge man (called John Howland) coming upon some occasion above the grattings, was, with a seele of the shipe throwne into (the) sea; but it pleased God that he caught hould of the top-saile halliards, which hunge over board, and rane out at length; yet he held his hould (though he was sundrie fadomes under water) till he was hald up by the same rope to the brime of the water, and then with a boat hooke and other means got into the shipe againe, and his life saved; and thought he was something ill with it, yet he lived many years after, and became a profitable member both in church and commone wealthe…”.{D9, page 94}

EVENT: On 6 Dec 1620 a Third Expedition was sent ashore to find a place for the colonists to settle. Ten of the groups “principall men” were in the party, including John Tilley, Richard Warren and John Howland. They landed at Plymouth on the 11th. About midnight they heard savages make “a hideous and great crie”. Shortly after 5:00 AM while preparing breakfast there was an Indian attack “and whithall their arrows came flying amongst them”. The landing party ran to recover their arms. After a brief exchange of gunfire and arrows the Indians withdrew. This was called “The First Encounter” (a battle with the native Indians) at Great Meadow Creek.{D7}

EVENT:
1. During the period 1633-35, John Howland was Governors Assistant.{D7}
2. On 25 Mar 1633 John Howland was taxed 18 shillings.{D12}
3. On 27 Mar 1634 John Howland was taxed 1 pound 4 shillings. {D12}
4. During 1634, John was in command of the Kennebec trading post.

EVENT: There was a tract of land in ME, patented by the Plymouth Colony for exclusive trade. This tract extended up the Kennebec River from Cobisecontt (present day Gardner, ME) to the falls or rapids of Nequamkick (near present day Winslow, ME). In April 1634, according to his deposition: John Howland was in charge of the Plymouth colony trading post on the east bank of the Kennebec River at Cushenoc, near what is now Augusta, ME. Another trader, named John Hocking, began illegally trading up stream by the rapids, so as to intercept the Indians as they came down river. Howland took 3 men up to Hocking and ordered him to leave. Hocking refused. Soon afterwards, Howland returned with his men to remove Hocking by cutting his mooring ropes. When the Plymouth traders paddled near Hocking’s boat, Hocking came out armed with a pistol and rifle. When he pointed a gun point blank at Talbott’s head, Howland asked him not to injure the man for he was only following his orders. Hocking paid no attention but shot Talbott dead. One of Talbott’s friend in the canoe returned fire killing Hocking.{D6} One hundred twenty years later, in 1754, as a safeguard against French and Indian raids, Fort Western was built on the site of the Plymouth Colonies old trading post. The Fort was restored in 1921 and subsequently presented to the city of Augusta, ME, where upon it has become a museum.

EVENT: On 28 Jul 1640 John Winslow sold for £12, the services of indentured servant Joseph Grosse, to John Howland for 5 years.{D12}

LIVELIHOOD:
1. In 1641 John Howland was Deputy to the General Court.{D7}
2. 5 Mar 1657 John Howland traded Christopher Winter “one half of the great Land” in the Township of Marshfield, including both upland and meadow with all the housing upon the land, for a farm called “the Govrs farm”, in the Township of Barnstable. The latter contained 90 acres of upland and 12 acres of meadow.{D5}
3. 1 Apr 1661 John Howland (of Plymouth), Abraham Peirse (of Duxburrow) and five others (all from the jurisdiction of Plymouth), bought a tract of land from Quachatasett Kesepett and Webcawett Doe, Indian Sagamores, for £50.00.{D4}

EVENT: John Howland and his son, Joseph, built farms at Rocky Nook in Kingston, the next town. When John’s house burned, he came into Plymouth to live with his son Jabez (at the ‘Howland house’, which still exists in 1994, see photgraph below) while he rebuilt the Rocky Nook farm which burned again some years later.{D11}  [Photo at left, excavation of  John Howland house on the Rocky Nook farm.]

WILL: Written 29 May 1672: “…Item I Will and bequeath unto my Deare and loving wife Elizabeth howland the use and benifitt of my now Dwelling house in Rockey nooke in the Township of Plymouth aforsaid, with the outstanding lands, That is uplands and meddow lands …Item I give unto my Daughter hope Chipman twenty shillings…” Therefollow four pages of personal, household inventory both itemized and valued.{D10}

The Jabez Howland House is the only existing house in Plymouth  where Pilgrims actually lived. The original 17th century two-story timber framed house consisted of the porch, hall and hall chamber. John Howland and his wife, Elizabeth Tilley Howland spent their winters here with their son Jabez and his family.  After John’s death at age 80, and the fire that destroyed their Rocky Nook farm, Elizabeth lived here until 1680 when Jabez sold the house. It was a private residence until 1912  when it was purchased for a museum.
In the 1940’s extensive work was done to bring it back to  its original appearance. Today the museum houses fine period furniture as well as artifacts from archeological digs at the Rocky Nook homes of John and Elizabeth and their son Joseph’s farm. [Photo right: Jabez Howland house.]

BURIAL: John Howland’s grave marker on Burial Hill, Plymouth, MA, reads: “Here ended the Pilgrimage of John Howland who died February 23, 1672-3 aged above 80 years. He married Elizabeth, daughter of John Tilley, who came with him in the Mayflower Dec 1620. From them are descended a numerous posterity. He was a godly man and an ancient professor in the wayes of Christ. Hee was one of the first comers into this land and was the last man that was left of those that came over in the shipp called Mayflower that lived in Plymouth.”{D2}

DOCUMENTS:
1. The English Ancestry and Homes of the Pilgrim Fathers by Charles Edward Banks, The Grafton Press Publishers, NY., p. 65.
2. Pilgrim Guide to Plymouth Massachusetts, by William Franklin Atwood, 1940, Paul W. Bittinger, Plymouth, MA, P. 22.
3. The Truth About the Pilgrims by F.R. Stoddard, 1952, published by the General Society of Mayflower Descendants.
4. The Mayflower Descendant, 1914, Vol XVI, article Plymouth Colony Deeds.
5. Ibed, Vol. XII, article Plymouth Colony Deeds, p. 81.
6. Ibed, Vol. II, article Depositions, p. 10.
7. Colonial Families of the United States of America, Vol. VII, Genealogical Publishing Co., Baltimore, 1966, pages 224-225.
8. The Mayflower Quarterly, August 1992, Vol. 58, No. #3, pg. 254.
9. Bradford’s History of Plymouth Plantation 1606 – 1646, reproduced.
10. The Mayflower Descendant, 1910, Vol. II, page 70. “John Howland’s Will and Inventory” as recorded in the Plymouth Colony Will and Inventories, Vol. III, Part I, pages 49 to 54.
11. The Mayflower Quarterly, Nov 1993, Vol. 59, No. #4, pg. 283.
12. Plymouth Colony: Its History and People 1620- 1691 by Eugene A. Stratton, 1986, publ by Ancestry Publishing, Salt Lake, UT

* Elizabeth TILLEY was born in ABT 1607 in England; baptized in 1608 in Henlow, Bedfordshire, England; died on 31 Dec 1687 in Swansea, Bristol, MA; buried in Swansea, Bristol, MA.

HOME: Elizabeth’s family was from Henlow, Bedfordshire, England.{D1} She was baptized at Henlow in 1608.{D5}

EVENT: Her parents, John and Elizabeth, died the first winter in America of the “General Sickness” leaving but one known child, Elizabeth, who married John Howland.{D6}

MARRIAGE: In 1623, at age 16 years, Elizabeth Tilley married ♥ John Howland at Plymouth. Their marriage produced eight children including, Desire, John, Jabez, Hope, Joseph, Isaac, Elizabeth and Lydia.{D4}

HISTORICAL NOTE: Elizabeth’s signature (at age 67) is found on a Bond of Administration of her deceased husbands estate, dated 5 Mar 1672.{D3} [Below: Signatures of John and Elizabeth Howland.]
WILL: The Will of Elizabeth Tilly-Howland was signed by her hand on 17 Dec 1686. The estate was left primarily to her children. Her daughter Hope Howland -Chipman died 3 years earlier. (married to elder John Chipman)

DEATH: Wednesday 21/31 December 1687. Elizabeth died at the age of 79 years, at Swansea, MA., in the house of her daughter Lydia, wife of James Brown.{D2}

DOCUMENTS:
1. The Mayflower Quarterly, Vol. 54, November 1988, p. 285.
2. Ibed, Vol. III, 1901, p. 54, article Elizabeth (Tilley) Howland’s Will. The Will is recorded in the Bristol Co., MA, Probate Records, Vol. I, p. 13-14.
3. The location of Elizabeth (Tilley) Howland’s autographs are discussed and shown in The Mayflower Descendant, Vol. XIII, April 1911, article An Autograph of Elizabeth (Tilley) Howland, p. 65.
4. Colonial Families in the United States of America, Vol. VII, Genealogical Publishing Co., Baltimore, 1966, pages 224-225
5. The Mayflower Quarterly, August 1992, Vol. 58, #3, pg. 254.
6. The English Ancestry and Homes of the Pilgrim Fathers, by Charles Edward Banks, The Grafton Press Publishers, NY.

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Filed under My family in history, __1. 1620 Mayflower lineage

Anthony Snow & Abigail Warren

(1620 Mayflower lineage, Warren branch)

*  Anthony SNOW was born in England; died AFT 8 Aug 1692 in Marshfield, Plymouth, MA; buried in Marshfield, Plymouth, MA.

Anthony SNOW married Abigail WARREN on 8 Nov 1639 in Plymouth, Plymouth, MA.
They had the following children: Josiah SNOW,♥ Lydia SNOW (b. ABT 1640), Abigail SNOW (b. ABT 1650), Sarah SNOW (b. Jun 1651), “son” SNOW (b. 25 Mar 1655), Alice SNOW (b.18 Jan 1657).

EVENT:
The first record of Anthony Snow in New England is seen on 7 May 1638, with his request for three acres  of land {D3}

MILITARY:
Anthony is on the list  of Plymouth men able to bear arms in 1643.{D3}

MARRIAGE:
Anthony Snow mentions “my welbeloved  wife Abigall” and “my daughters Lidia, Sarah…” in his  Will.{D2}

HOME:
On 9 Jan 1639, in consideration of marriage
between Anthony Snow and Abigail Warren, Anthony received from Abigail’s  mother, the widow Elizabeth Warren, a house and eight acres of adjoining land at Wellingsly, alias Hobs Hole, MA.{D1}

[Memorial monument to the Early Settlers of Green Harbor, Marshfield, MA.]

LIVELIHOOD: {D4}
Anthony Snow was a feltmaker by trade. He farmed and fished, served as a constable and a deputy to the court, contributed a barrel of beef toward the purchase of Bulkley’s parsonage and served as one of the towns first selectmen on 5 Apr 1667.
Shortly after marriage Mr. Snow removed to Marshfield, where he became one of the leading citizens of the town:
•  was surveyor of highways in 1651, constable 1652,
•  representative to the General Court of Plymouth Colony in 1656 and
•  20 years following, selectman in 1666 and afterwards several years,
•  collector of the excise 3 June 1668, and
•  member of the Plymouth Council-of-War for Plymouth Colony in 1675.

BURIAL:
Buried at the Winslow Cemetery in Marshfield, Plymouth County, Massachusetts.

WILL:
Anthony’s Will, dated 28 Dec 1685, lists his  properties, including: 1) A house and barn, orchards and land at or near South River; 2) two oxen, 4 cows, and other cattle to be divided into four parts; 3) about 60 acres at Mattakeset; 4) land at Namasket; 5) ” other lands”; 6) mare, sheep, swine; 7) about 114 and 17 shillings in money; 8) considerable value in household goods.{D2}

Anthony’s Will names wife, Abigaill, daughters Lidia, Sarah and Alis, also other family members and friends.{D3}

Mayflower Families  Through Five Generations Vol 18 Part 1 Third Edition The will of Anthony Snow of Marshfield dated 28 Dec 1685, codicil dated 8 Aug 1692, sworn 3 Jan 1692/3, names wife Abigal; grandson James Ford; son Josias Snow, daughters Lidia, Sarah and Alis (no surnames); dau, Abigall’s children; “daughter in law my son Josias wife”; grandchildren James, Hannah and Abigall Ford; brother Joseph Warren and friend Capt. Nathaniel Thomas to be overseers. On 3 Jan 1692/3 Abigal Snow, widow of Anthony Snow, swore to the inventory. The inventory was dated 12 Nov. 1692.

Marshfield A Town of  Villages 1640-1990 by Krusell and Bates
“Anthony Snow’s will dated 8 Dec 1685 is in possession of the Connecticut Historical Society at Hartford, CT. Anthony Snow was one of the last Marshfield downtown settlers for whom Snow Road is named. He received one-half of the Thomas Prence grant in 1649. The parcel included a part of Cedar Grove Cemetery that Snow gave to the town and the swamp (Snow’s Swamp) where much of the shopping and parking areas are today. It also included land along Ocean Street easterly as far at the Bourne grant (near Bourne Park Avenue) this flat land between the rivers were meadows and streams, wetlands, and swamps. Anthony Snow was a felt maker by trade. He farmed and fished, served as a constable and a deputy to the court, contributed a barrel of beef toward the purchase of Bulkley’s parsonage and served as one of the town’s first selectmen on 5 Apr 1667. Many of downtown Marshfield businesses today are built on the land that belong to Anthony Snow.”

DOCUMENTS:
1. Records of the Colony of New Plymouth in New England, Deeds , Vol. I, 1620-1651, edited by David Pulsifer, 1861, Boston; reprinted 1968, AMS Press, NY, p. 53.
2. The Mayflower Descendant, Vol. V, Jan. 1903, article Anthony Snows Will and Inventory. The Will is in the possession of the Connecticut Historical Society at Hartford, CT. The Will and inventory are also recorded in the Plymouth County Probate Records, Vol. I, pages 156-158
3. Mayflower Families In  Progress – Richard Warren…, published by General Society of Mayflower Descendants, 1987, p. 4
4.  http://www.geni.com/people/Anthony-Snowe/6000000000293431306
.

*  Abigail WARREN was  born in ABT 1618 in England; died on AFT 3 Jan 1692/1693 in Marshfield, Plymouth, MA; buried in Marshfield, Plymouth, MA.

TRAVEL:
Abigail Warren came to America with her mother, Elizabeth and four older sisters on the Anne, in 1623. Her father, Richard Warren, came on the Mayflower in 1620 as one of the original Pilgrim colonists.{D1}

MARRIAGE:
On 9 Jan 1639,  Abigail received her “marriage portion” from her mother. On 8 November 1639 Abigail married Anthony Snow.{D1}  Her marriage to Anthony produced six children, one of whom died in infancy.{D1}

Richard Warren of the Mayflower, and some of his Descendants” NEHGR vol 55
page 76
Abigail, when she married Anthony Snow of Plymouth, received as a marriage portion from her mother, 9 Jan 1639, a deed for her “house situated near the place called Wellingsley (alias) Hob’s Hole, with the eight acres of land thereunto adjoining.” Shortly after marriage Mr. Snow removed to Marshfield, where he became one of the leading citizens of the town; was surveyor of highways in 1651, constable 1652, representative to the General Court of Plymouth Colony in 1656 and twenty years following, selectman in 1666 and afterwards several years, collector of the excise 3 June 1668, and member of the Plymouth Council-of-War for Plymouth Colony in 1675. Sometime before his death he gave to the town a piece of land near the meeting-house for a grave yard, where he is buried and which is still in use. His will dated 28 Dec 1685, with codicil of 8 August 1692, named wife Abigail, and children given below. Inventory of his estate taken 12 Nov 1692.

DEATH:
Abigail died in Marshfield on 3 January 1692/3, at about 74 years of age.{D1}

DOCUMENTS:
1.  Mayflower Families In Progress – Richard Warren…, published by General Society of Mayflower Descendants, 1987, p. 4.
2.  Individual source: Mayflower Families In Progress: Richard Warren of the Mayflower and His Descendants for Four Generations, compiled by Robert S. Wakefield and others, Published by
General Society of Mayflower Descendants, 1987.

Note: All of Richard Warren’s children survived to adulthood, married, and had large families: making Richard Warren one of the most common Mayflower passengers to be descended from.  Richard Warren’s descendants include such notables as Civil War general Ulysses S. Grant, President Franklin D. Roosevelt, and Alan B. Shepard, Jr. the first American in space and the fifth person to walk on the moon.

DOCUMENTS:
1 . Mayflower Families In  Progress – Richard Warren…, published by General Society of Mayflower Descendants, 1987, p. 4.
2.  Mayflower  Families In Progress: Richard Warren of the Mayflower and His Descendants for Four Generations, compiled by Robert S. Wakefield and others, Published by General Society of Mayflower Descendants, 1987.

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Filed under My family in history, __1. 1620 Mayflower lineage

Stephen Skiffe and Lydia Snow

(1620 Mayflower lineage, Warren branch)

*  Stephen SKIFFE, Captain, was born on 14 Apr 1641 in Sandwich, Barnstable, MA; died  8 Jun 1710 in Sandwich, Barnstable, MA; buried in Sandwich, Barnstable,MA.

Stephen SKIFFE married Lydia SNOW in ABT 1665 in Plymouth, MA. They had the following children: Abigail SKIFFE (b. 2 May 1666),  Deborah SKIFFE (b. 14 Jul 1668), ♥  Marcy (Mary) SKIFFE (b. 13 Nov 1671), Lydia SKIFFE (b. ABT 1675), Steven SKIFFE (b.4 Feb 1685).

BIRTH:
Stephen Skiffe, son of James and Mary Skiffe, was born at Sandwich, Barnstable Co., MA on 14 April 1641.{D1}

LIVELIHOOD:
A ship’s captain. {D2} He also was Justice of the Peace and Rep. to General Court 1676 and after.{D3}

WILL:
In his Will, dated 7 May 1701, Stephen names wife Lydia,  daughter ♥ Marcy (Mary)  Chipman and other  immediate family members.{D1}

DEATH: In the inventory of his  personal belongings, it was stated that Stephen died on 8 June 1710.{D1}

BURIAL:
Old Town Cemetery Sandwich, Barnstable County, Massachusetts.
[Photograph: Stephen Skiffe’s marker]

DOCUMENTS:
1. Mayflower Families in Progress – Richard Warren…, published by General Society of Mayflower Descendants, 1987, p. 21.
2. The Chipman Family: A Genealogy of the Chipmans In America  1631-1920 by Bert Lee Chipman, 1920, Winston -Salem, NC.
3.  http://history.vineyard.net/skiffe.htm
4. Individual source: The Chipman Family: A Genealogy of the Chipman’s In America 1631-1920 by Bert Lee Chipman, 1920, Winston -Salem, NC.

.

*  Lydia SNOW was born in ABT 1640 in Plymouth, Plymouth, MA; died on ABT 17 Mar 1713 in Sandwich, Barnstable, MA; buried in Sandwich, Barnstable, MA. (Grand-daughter of Mayflower ancestor, Richard Warren)

BIRTH: Lydia Snow was born to Anthony Snow and Abigail Warren at Plymouth, MA, about 1640.{D1}

MARRIAGE: 14 April 1641, Lydia married Stephen Skiffe. Their union produced five children, Abigail, Deborah, Marcy (Mary), Lydia and Steven.{D1}

HOME: Lydia and Anthony apparently lived their entire married life in Sandwich, MA.

EVENT: Lydia’s father, Anthony Snow, mentions her in his Will, stating, “…Item I give and bequeath unto my Daughters Lidia Sarah & alis & to my Dater Abigalls Children all the
 Rest of my neat Cattle To be Equally devided into four parts & each sister
 to have one part & Abigalls Children to have one part only…I give unto my
Daughter Lidia ten pounds in money & to my daughter Sarah ten pounds in
mony…”{D2}

Burial: Old Town Cemetery Sandwich, Barnstable County, Massachusetts.
[Photograph: Lydia (Snow) Skiffe’s marker]

DOCUMENTS:
1. Mayflower Families In Progress
– Richard Warren
…, published by General Society of Mayflower Descendants, 1987, p. 21.
2.  The Mayflower Descendant, Vol. V, Jan. 1903, article Anthony Snow’s Will and Inventory. The Will is in the possession of the Connecticut Historical Society at Hartford, CT. The Will and inventory are also recorded in the Plymouth County Probate Records, Vol. I, pages 156-158
3. Individual source: Mayflower Families In Progress: Richard Warren of the Mayflower and His Descendants for Four Generations, compiled by Robert S. Wakefield and others, Published by
General Society of Mayflower Descendants, 1987.

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Filed under Autobiography, __1. 1620 Mayflower lineage

Perez Chipman Sr. & Perez Chipman Jr.

(1620 Mayflower lineage)

PEREZ (PARIS) CHIPMAN SR. and MARGARET WHEELER

* Perez CHIPMAN Sr. was born on 28 Sep 1702 in Sandwich, MA; died in 1781 in Sussex, DE; buried in Sussex, DE.

Perez CHIPMAN married (1) Margaret Hinckley,  (2) Margaret Wheeler in 1725, (3) Judith Draper in 1740.
In the marriage to Margaret WHEELER, they had the following children: John CHIPMAN, Sarah CHIPMAN, Betsy CHIPMAN, Kezia CHIPMAN, ♥ Perez CHIPMAN Jr. (b. ABT 1730), Benjamin CHIPMAN, Love CHIPMAN, Draper CHIPMAN, Mellicent CHIPMAN, Mary CHIPMAN.

Perez lived the last years of his life in Sussex Co., DE, but is believed to have lived in some other New England state for a considerable time.

The children of John Chipman spread out in the colonies as noted by their half brother Handley Chipman in his short family history, “They scattered much in their Settling in families.”{D1}

LIVELIHOOD:
Handley continued writing about his half brothers, which included Perez Chipman Sr., stating, “They were mostly of more than middling size. James was a clothier by Trade, Perez was a blacksmith as was also Ebebezer, John was a farmer and Stephen a cooper by trade…” {D1}
Blacksmiths, or “smiths,” were key contributors to American colonial society. Manipulating  iron for everything from shoeing horses to manufacturing and repairing tools and  utensils, blacksmiths were involved in all aspects of colonial life. The high colonial regard for labor along with the utility of the business made  blacksmithing a reputable and worthy occupation. [Internet image left: Colonial blacksmith. Image below right: Examples of blacksmith metal work.]

.
DOCUMENTS:
1.  A Chipman Family History by Handley Chipman (1717-1799) of Newport, RI and Cornwallis, Nova Scotia. Reproduced and printed by “The New England Historical and Genealogical Register”, 1937, Vol. XCI, Published by the Society at the Robert Henry Eddy Memorial Rooms, Boston.
•  Individual source: The Chipman Family: A Genealogy of the Chipmans In America 1631-1920 by Bert Lee Chipman, 1920, Winston -Salem, NC.
•  Individual source: Mayflower Families In Progress: Richard Warren of the Mayflower and His Descendants for Four Generations, compiled by Robert S. Wakefield and others, Published by
General Society of Mayflower Descendants, 1987.

* Margaret WHEELER  was born 1702 in Sussex Co., Delaware and died in 1739 Somerset, MD
Individual source: The Chipman Family: A Genealogy of the Chipmans In America 1631-1920 by Bert Lee Chipman, 1920, Winston -Salem, NC.

.
.
PEREZ (PARIS) CHIPMAN JR. and MARGARET MANLOVE

* Perez CHIPMAN Jr. was born April 1730 in Sussex, DE; died on 13 Mar 1801 in Deep River, Guilford, NC; buried in Deep River, Guilford, NC.

Perez Chipman Jr. married Margaret MANLOVE on 3 Oct 1751 in Camden, DE. They had the following children: Eunice CHIPMAN (b. 20 Jun 1752), ♥ Harriet Hannah CHIPMAN (b. 11 Nov 1753), Mary CHIPMAN (b. 27 Jul 1756), Deborah CHIPMAN (b. 31 Dec 1758), John CHIPMAN (b. 24 Mar 1761), Paris CHIPMAN III (b. 11 Sep 1763).

Perez signed his name as “Perez” on his Will, but the writer of the Will spelled his name “Paris”, both spellings were considered correct in the 18th Century.

HOME:
Perez lived, from 1749 to about the close of the Revolutionary War, in Camden, DE, and then moved to Deep River, Guilford Co., NC.

EVENT:
1. A manumission deed for Kent County, DE, dated 24 May 1766, shows Paris and Margaret Chipman freeing a Negro boy named Thomas.{D3}
2. “While the British army had control of Delaware, a party of their soldiers came to get from him what plunder they could, but, from respect for the non-combative principles indicated by his coat, agreed to divide the bacon in his meat-house equally with him. He looked on quietly until the division was made, then his manhood rising to energy, he pitched them all out of doors with his own hands.”{D2}

RELIGION:
Perez was a leading figure in a religious group known as the Nicholites, a Quaker like group that formed in  Kent County, Delaware. “Chipman was one of the first Nicholites to leave Maryland-Delaware area where upon he and another settler bought 640 acres in Guilford Co., NC in 1775.”{D3} See genealogy posts: a) Jeffrey Horney III and b) William Coffin for further details about the Nicholite religion.

In Guilford Co., NC, a “Nicholite Meeting House” was built. (In 1994 this location is just NW of High Point Reservoir.) Perez lived 2.6 miles north of the meeting house. His son-in-law William Horney and daughter, Hannah Chipman, bought land and resided about 0.7 mile north of the meeting house.{D4}

LIVELIHOOD:
Perez Chipman Jr was a  “fuller” or clothier. {D2}

MILITARY:
“CHIPMAN, Perez, born ca. 1730, d 13 Mar 1801, m Margaret Manlove, Patriot Service, NC.”{D1} Services rendered in the establishment of American Independence: “For sundries furnished the militia of North Carolina Virginia and South Carolina as allowed by Bruce and Baggee Auditors to
Perez Chipman”{D5} Both Perez Chipman Jr. and his father Perez Chipman furnished sundries for the Colonial soldiers.

WILL:
“I give and bequeath unto my Loving wife Margaret. The full use and Priviledge of my house During her Lifetime, and also what income is to be paid by my Two sons Together with as much of my stock and movables as she Sees proper to have and one Hundred Pounds in hard money to be paid by my Executors to be here after mentioned…that my land Called farlow shall eaqually Devided by my two Sons John & Paris…The residue of my Estate both Real and Tomporal to be appraised and Devided in three parts one third to my son John, and one third to my son Paris, and the other third to be Equally Devided Between my Two Daughters, ♥ Hannah Horney & Mary Horney…” Signed by Perez Chipman on 13 Jan 1797.

DOCUMENTS
1. DAR Patriot Index, Washington, 1966, p. 129.
2. The Chipman Family: A Genealogy  of the Chipmans In America  1631-1920 by Bert Lee Chipman, 1920, Winston -Salem, NC.
3. Joseph Nichols and the Nicholites: A Look at the ‘New Quakers’ of Maryland, Delaware, North and South Carolina by Kenneth Lane Carroll, 1962, published by The Easton Publishing Company, Easton, Maryland.
4. “18th Century Historical Documentation Map”, Guilford County, NC
5. Account of the U.S. with North Carolina, War of the Revolution, Book A, Page 272. See also NSDAR
National Number 336008.
6. Individual source: The Chipman Family: A Genealogy of the Chipmans In America 1631-1920 by Bert Lee Chipman, 1920, Winston -Salem, NC.

* Margaret MANLOVE daughter of William Manlove and Elizabeth Browne was born in 1728; died on 23 Feb 1803 in Deep River, Guilford, NC; buried inDeep River,Guilford, NC.

Individual source: The Chipman Family: A Genealogy of the Chipmans In America 1631-1920 by Bert Lee Chipman, 1920, Winston -Salem, NC.

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Filed under My family in history, __1. 1620 Mayflower lineage, __2. Settlers and Migrants

William Horney, Private in American Revolution, Nicholite by faith

(Settlers and Migrants, Horney family)

* William HORNEY was born in ABT 1751 in Caroline, MD; died in 1829 in Bellbrook, Greene, OH; buried in Pioneer Cemetery, Bellbrook,Greene,OH.

William Horney married Harriet Hannah CHIPMAN in 1772 in MD. They had the following children: Margaret HORNEY (b. ABT 1773), James HORNEY (b. 1774), Paris HORNEY (b. 1776), Deborah HORNEY (b. 1778), Mary HORNEY (b. 6 Mar 1780), Lydia HORNEY (b. 5 Aug 1782), William HORNEY (b. 1784), Daniel HORNEY (b. 1786), Hannah HORNEY (b. 1788), John HORNEY (b. 1790), Chipman HORNEY (b. 23 Feb 1793), Sarah HORNEY (b. 1795), ♥ Jeffrey HORNEY (b. 7 Mar 1798).

MARRIAGE:
William Horney married Hannah Chipman in Maryland, his brother, John, married Hannah’s sister, Mary Chipman.

MILITARY:
“HORNEY Wm., b c. 1750/1, d 1829, m Hannah Chipman, rank Private, MD.”{D3}  William and his brother John served together in the War for Independence.  1778 William enlisted for 3 years service in  the Maryland 5th Regiment.{D4}
•  According to a military Roll Call, dated 8 Sep 1778, William Horney, was a Private in Captain Levin Handy’s Company of the 5th Maryland Regiment, commanded by Colonel W. Richardson.{D4}
•  1778-1780 Pvt. Wm. Horney in Captain William Riley’s Company, 5th Maryland Regiment.{D6}
•  7 Feb 1779 William reenlisted into the same unit.{D4}
•  Listed as Pvt. in muster roll of the 5th MD Regt., Capt. William Rie Cup’s Company on Aug 1780 and Jan 1781. The 4th and 5th Maryland Regiments fought in the Battle of the Cowpens.

24 Mar 1797 William was issued 100 acres of Bounty Land, Warrant Number #11302, as part of the pay incentive  for serving in the Continental Army.{D5}{D7}

RELIGION:
William was born into a Quaker (pacifist) family. Because William and his brother John served in the Colonial Militia during the American Revolution, their father, Jeffrey Horney Jr., left them only a comparative pinnace of £10 each in his Will. By the end of the Revolutionary War, the brothers William, John and James Horney had become Nicholites, a Quaker like religious group that formed in Delaware.{D11}

TRAVEL:
William, his wife Hannah and family, moved to Deep River area of Guilford County, NC in 1778. William’s brothers John and James and their families were also part of the small migration of Nichollites who removed to NC.{D11}

HOME:
In Guilford Co., NC, a “Nicholite Meeting House” was built. William’s home and farm was located about 0.66 mile north of the Meeting House. William’s father-in-law Perez Chipman Jr. lived 2.6 miles north of the meeting house.{D13}

EVENT:
During the 1790s, with the death of many of the original founding members, the Nicholites began merging with the Quakers. About 1801 or 1802, with the dissolution of the Nicholite religious group, William, brother John and their families moved toOhio.

HISTORICAL NOTE:
The first white settlement in the Ohio was in 1788, at Marietta. In the same year a settlement was also established at Cincinnati. During the next few years other villages sprang up, particularly in the south.

HOME:
William purchased 51 acres of land from Josiah Hunt and 11.5 acres from Edward Mercer in 1804.  He bought a 90 acre parcel from Richard Mendenhall in 1818. All of the land records refer to the lands as being “on the waters of Caesars Creek”, but no survey location was given on any of them. {D14}  “William and John Horney settled early on the farm now (the author wrote this in 1881) owned by Amos Williams. John devoted himself to hunting and shooting the game which was here in abundance.”{D2} In 1807 an enumeration of white males in Xenia Twp., Greene Co. OH above the age of 21 years was taken, among those recorded were the familiar names: James Anderson, William Anderson, John H. Anderson and William Horney…{D9, p.28-30}

LIVELIHOOD:
He was a planter and farmer.

WILL:
William made his Will on 6 April 1817. The disposition of his property is as follows:
Daniel was to receive 80 acres on Sugar Creek;  Chipman would get 120 acres on Sugar Creek also a bed and furniture;  Jeffrey, he Willed, “I give unto my son ♥ Jeffrey Horney my homeplace , one waggon &
gears One Dark bay mare, eight years old, and one cow and calf and the ballance of the bedding to be left to said Jeffry”; the balance of the estate to be divided amongst daughters Mary, Lydia, Hannah and Sarah.  Sarah, one horse and saddle, bed and furniture, cow and calf, spinning wheel.
Hannah, a bed and furniture. John, a bed and furniture. Margaret’s children $1.00; Paris’ children $1.00.  James $1.00; Deborah $1.00; Mary $1.00; Lydia $1.00; William $1.00.{D12}

BURIAL:
William was buried in the old Pioneer Cemetery, 1/4 mile north of Bellbrook’s modern cemetery. William and Harriet’s grave markers are not amongst those that have survived to the present. A grave stone for William was erected in the modern Bellbrook Cemetery noting William as a Patriot in the American Revolution. His monument sits directly in front of the cemetery flagpole.{D10}

DOCUMENTS:
1. Land Records: GreeneCounty Recorders Office, Greene County Courthouse, Xenia, OH.
Ask for copies of Volume #1, pages 103, 107 & 141; Vol. #6, page 88.
2. History of Fayette County by R.S. Dills, 1881,, Odell & Mayer Publishers, Dayton, OH., p. 642.
3. DAR Patriot Index, Washington, 1966.
4. Revolutionary War records of William Horney – Reference Services Branch, National Archives and Records Service, 8th and Pennsylvania Ave. NW, Washington DC 20408.
5. Maryland Revolutionary Records, by Newman.
6. Roster of Revolutionary Ancestors, Volume I, Indiana DAR.
7. Note: Information concerning the issuance of land warrants is found in “Land Warrants Issued Prior to 1800”, Vol. 2-4. Other records regarding applications for warrants were destroyed in the War Department fire of 9 Nov 1800. Information concerning warrants surrendered to the Federal Government may be found in General Land Office records at the National Archives.
8. William Horney estate papers. Greene County Court of Common Pleas, Vol. G, pages 223-224.
9. Robinsons History of Greene County Ohio, by George F. Robinson, 1902, reprinted 1973.
10. Soldiers of American Revolution Buried in Ohio, Cat. # 1-973344, H., Vol. 1, page 192, “HORNEY, WILLIAM Greene County,Ohio.”
11.  Joseph Nichols and the Nicholites: A Look at the ‘New Quakers’ of Maryland, Delaware, North and South Carolina by Kenneth Lane Carroll, 1962, published by The Easton Publishing Company, Easton,
Maryland.
12.  Document at: Greene County Court of Common Pleas, Vol. G, pages 223-224,Greene County, OH.
13. “18th Century Historical Documentation Map”, Guilford County,NC.
14. Green County Recorders Office, Greene County Courthouse, Xenia, OH ask for Land Records, Vol.1, Pages 103, 107; vol. 6, page 88 for copies of the originals.
Individual source: TITLE: Betebenner – Horney and Allied Families, 1981 by Evelyn Halkyard Vohland, Published by The Clipper Publishers, Shelton, NE, 297 pages, hardbound.

* Harriet Hannah CHIPMAN was born on 11 Nov 1753 in Caroline, MD (her family lived in Camden, DE); died AFT 1804 in Bellbrook, Greene, OH; buried in Pioneer Cemetery, Bellbrook, Greene, OH.

Individual source: TITLE: Betebenner – Horney and Allied Families, 1981 by Evelyn Halkyard Vohland, Published by The Clipper Publishers, Shelton, NE, 297 pages, hardbound.

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William Horney and the Nicholites
(also William Coffin, Paris (Perez) Chipman and their families)

“A very interesting sect which saw its rise in the rural area along the Delaware-Marylandboarder in the 1760s owed its existence to Joseph Nichols. A native of  Delaware, he was born near Dover about 1730 and engaged in husbandry in Kent county, Delaware. Nichols received very littleformal education but is said to have been “endowed with strong powers of mind and a remarkable flow of spirits”.

After 1764, Nichols bought 224 acres in Mispillion Hundred on the south side of Ivy Branch, in Kent County. “Joseph Nichols humor, vivacity and ability to amuse others made his company much sought after by the young people of his neighborhood so that Sundays he was frequently the center of a crowd. At these and other times, Nichols often entertained his friends with anecdotes and songs. During one such pleasant gathering,” where they met together for merriment such as dancing, etc, he was accompanied by a very particular and intimate friend, who was taken ill and died suddenly at that place.

As Joseph reflected on the circumstance, it was made the means of producing a radical reform in his life and conduct. Nichols became convinced that he and his friends should read a portion of the Scripture whenever they met. Out of the respect his neighbors had for him, they agreed. With the passage of time these gatherings were transformed from scenes of “mirth,’ to seasons of serious thoughtfulness.” Nichols genius in friendship enabled him to move many of his friends and acquaintances along with him on his religious pilgrimage – so that “as he became more circumspect’ in appearance, behavior and conversation, so did they.”
As the Nicholites ministry developed, Joseph Nichols was thusly described, “He appeared to me to be between thirty and forty years of age. In stature, he was about middle size, dressed very plainly, principally in undyed clothes.”

Observers were struck by the similarity between the Nicholites and the Quakers, when asked about this a Nicholite would say, “We Do profess and Confess the same principles that the Quakers Doth, but for Some reasons which we Could render if requested, we hither to have not thought it best to Joyn Membership with them.”
The basic beliefs of the Nicholites and Quaker religions were essentially the same: there was emphasis on the inner light, pacification, simplicity, plainness, and opposition to a “hireling ministry”. Joseph Nichols taught his followers that, just as in the case of the first century Christians and their own Quaker neighbors, they should avoid going to court to settle their difficulties.
The Nicholites came to oppose war and slavery, “believing that war came from the basic causes a slavery-luxury and desire for selfish.”

In April 1766, one of Nichols earliest and staunchest followers, James and Ann Anderson of Kent County, Delaware, freed a slave named, Jane. “Another manumission deed for the same county, dated 24 may 1766 shows Paris and Margaret Chipman freeing a Negro boy names, Thomas”. “A year later, on 12 August 1767, William Anderson freed five slaves: John, age 26; Lydia, 25; and her three children.”

“Some Nicholites carried their zeal even further. James Horney refused to eat with slaveholders or to use any goods either produced or procured through slave labor. Horney, like Nichols, knew that when one is content to benefit from the fruits of slavery, he enters to some degree into the position of being a slaveholder himself.

 Joseph Nichols work was cut short by his death in bed in December 1770, while still a young man. Though his religious career was a relatively short eight years, the work he accomplished was destined to continue long after the man ceased to be.

In 1774, four years after their leaders death, the Nicholites had become aware that they must organize themselves and set up some sort of church government so the life of the movement could be regulated. The decision was signed by James and Ann Anderson, James Horney, William Warren and thirteen others on behalf of the larger Nicholite Society. It was these fourteen men and three women, most of whom were living in Caroline County, Maryland who probably furnished most of the leadership and guidance received by the Nicholites following Joseph Nichols death.

About the time the Society was organizing in Maryland, a number of Nicholites left their homes and moved southward. Among the reasons for their movement were the unsettled conditions in the years after Joseph Nichols death, problems arising from the religious establishment, the availability of news and cheap southern land and other factors.

It is unknown exactly when the idea of starting a new life in another section of the country occurred, but it may have been ♥ Paris (Perez) Chipman of Kent County, Delaware, who provided the inspiration and guidance for this migration. Chipman was one of the first Nicholites to leave the Maryland-
Delaware are whereupon he and another settler bought 640 acres in Guilford County, North Carolina in 1775.

By 1778, the original Nicholite settlers in Guilford County had been joined by (brothers) John, James
and ♥ William Horney[1] and at least twelve other families including Nichols remarried wife and her
children. Several families had settled in the Deep River area in 1774-75 and a much larger group arrived in 1778. Other Nicholites from Delaware-Maryland area, such as Major Anderson arrived from time to time during the following years.

Almost all the land grants made to the Nicholites were located on Deep River, Wolf’s Island Creek, Reed Fork, Matrimony Creek and Haw River and had entered claims by the end of 1778.
[Map: Guilford County, NC, 1986 Deptartment of Transportation. The original source map for locating these ancestor home was a Guilford County, North Carolina 18th Century Historical Documentation Map. The 18th Century map (the 1700s) shows the home locations of settler/farmers over the entire county, streams, Colonial roads. printing on the colonial map was too small to read in this reduced blog space.] See also my Genealogy/William Coffin post, for additional details

“…the Quaker minister, Job Scott, visited the Nicholites of Deep River at their meeting house in October 1789. The date of the erection of this meeting house is not known, but approximate location can be determined from Guilford country deeds.

In November 1796, Isaac Odle sold 16-1/4 acres to the “Members of the Society of People called
Nicholites”…for benefit of Isaac Nichols and heirs forever”…”on the waters of Israel’s Creek, being part of a lot the said Odle lately bought of George Pope”. This land was on the south side of Israel’s Creek and joined the lands of James Caldwell and John Horney (Gfd Deed Bk. 6:237). Pope had purchased the land from Isaac Hiatt in December 1795. Hiatt had been granted the land as a part of a grant from the state of North Carolina n May 1787.

Israel’s Creek is now known as Hiatt’s Branch and flows east into Oak Hollow lake along the present northern city limits of High Point. One of the forks of this creek, which flows south through Oakview Estates subdivision, is now known as Horney’s Branch and is the “Israel’s Cree” referred to in the deed for the Nicholite land. The Nicholite Meeting House would then have been located on Horney’s Branch about 2000 feet upstream from it junction with Hiatt’s Branch.
[The drawing above was made of the New Garden Meeting House in 1859, and photocopied from The Pictoral Field Book of the Revolution, copr. 1859, by B.J. Lossing, Published in 2 volumes by Harper Brothers.

In the summer of 1778, the Nicholites wrote a petition to the North Carolina General Assembly seeking certain rights and privileges for their group. This petition was signed by nine male Nicholites, including Paris Chipman, John Horney[2] and William Horney.

Before the summer of 1778, the aforementioned Nicholite Meeting House was built near Deep River in Guilford County. See the Historical Documentation map associated with this article for its approximate location, as well as the homes of ancestors, William Horney, Paris (Perez) Chipman and William Coffin.

“In the 1790s, with the death of many of the original founding members, the Nicholites began to merge with the Quakers-Society of friends. An examination of the Wills for Caroline County, Maryland showed that James Horney died in 1794. Benjamin Chipman died in 1772, in Kent County Delaware. James Anderson died in 1791. In all, some twenty six of the older members died.”

On 25 October 1797, some eighty Nicholites petitioned to join the Society of friends, among these were James and wife, Celia Anderson. The petition was presented to members of the Marshy Creek Preparative Meeting near what is now Preston, Maryland.

 “The Nicholites had only a brief existence. The “New Quakers” became Quakers, so that few traces of the old movement remains. Knowledge of the Nicholite Society has become such a fading tradition in the areas where the Society once waxed strong, that many who were born and have grown up in these localities have never heard of this unusual sect which once flourished on the Delmarva Peninsula and which gave birth to the two smaller bodies in North and South Carolina.

Mant Probate records, wills and administration records,  as seen below, can be found in : Calendar of Kent County, Delaware, Probate Records, 1680-1800 (Dover 1944).

♥ Benjamin Chipman died 19 April 1772.
Will probate: 23 June 1772
Wife Mary; daughter Susanna; sons Stephan and Benjamin.
Witnesses: Patrick Crain, ♥ Perez Chipman and Reuben Shield.

Sources:
•  Joseph Nichols And the  Nicholites: A Look at the New Quakers of Maryland, Delaware and South Carolina, © 1962 by Kenneth Lane Carroll, published by The Easton Publishing Company, Easton, MD, abt. 110 pages.
•  The Nicholites of Jamestown and Deep River, by Jack L. Perdue
•  Guilford Count, North Carolina 18th Century Historical Documentation Map
•  Guilford County, North Carolina, 1986, D.O.T.  map
This work compiled by Larry F. Pierce, May  1988.


[1]  John, James and ♥ William Horney were the eldest sons of Jeffrey Horney III. Jeffrey Horney III. died a year later in 1779, still in Caroline County, Maryland. (See also my post Genealogy/Horney family: Geoffrey Sr., Geoffrey Jr. & Jeffrey  III)
[2] John Horney was brother of  our William Horney, while John’s wife, Mary was sister to my ancestor, ♥ Hannah (Chipman) Horney.

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