Category Archives: __6. Medical

Temporary tooth filling & crown repair

(Survival Manual/6. Medical/a) Dental/Temp filling  & crown repair)

A.  Temporary filling
Temporary tooth filling compounds can either hold displaced crown in place or fill a tooth for up to about two weeks. They are  a great thing to have if you cannot consult a dentist right away – like when you’re camping in the middle of nowhere and have a dislodged crown.

The typical sign of a dislodged crown or a lost filling is when you feel pain when cold liquids, food, your tongue, or cold air touches the delicate area that was previously protected with a filling.

What you need for the temporary filling or repair
Use the mixture available with a few first aid kits or stand alone dental repair kits, i.e., Dentemp. In a case where this is not available, you could roll a ball of sugarless gum or use candle wax or ski wax instead.
•  Premixed compounds/kit i.e.; Dentemp OS, Refilit, Temparin, Recapit
•  Antiseptic soap
•  Latex gloves
•  Some disinfected water, and
•  Oil of cloves to act as a painkiller.

Procedure for applying a temporary tooth filling
__1.  Clean your hands with the antiseptic soap and put on the pair of latex gloves.
__2.  Prepare the temporary filling – roll a ball of sugarless gum ( or wax ) or if you have it – use the premixed compound.
__3.  Use the disinfected water to thoroughly rinse the mouth.
__4.  Apply a drop of oil of cloves (or eugenol ) to the spot in the mouth where the filling or crown was earlier. This should ease the pain in the mouth.
__5.  Place the temporary filling carefully into the hole and be sure to cover exposed tissues if any.
__6.  Gently bite down and line the tooth with the one either below or above it.
__7.  You might want to wait before the filling hardens in case you are using either the premixed compound or the one from a first aid kit.

More about tooth fillings
•  Fillings are very common with dental work, as they present a way to repair a tooth that has suffered from decay or a cavity back to its original shape. When performing a filling, the dentist will remove the decayed area of the tooth, clean around it, then fill in the area that he has removed with a special material that will cater to the shape and form of the tooth.
•  Fillings work by closing out the area where the bacteria enters into teeth, helping to prevent any type of decay in the future. The materials used for fillings include porcelain, gold, composite resin, and amalgam. There is really no best type of filling, as several factors come into play. Your reaction to different material, the shape of the tooth, extent of repair, and where the filling is needed will be determining factors as to what material is used with your filling.
•  The gold fillings that are used are made in a laboratory, then cemented into place by the dentist. Gold material fits well with the gums, and can last you for many years. Gold is considered by many to be the best, although it is also the most expensive and will require you to visit the dentist several times before the filling will be complete.
•  Silver fillings on the other hand, are less expensive than gold materials and they can be quite resistant to wear. With their color being dark, they are easier to notice than composite or porcelain fillings, and aren’t recommended for visible areas of the mouth, especially the front teeth. Composite fillings are a common type of material, as they match the color of your teeth. The material that makes up the composite filling is mixed then placed directly in the cavity, where it hardens. They last several years, although composite isn’t recommended for large cavities, or areas where they may chip.
•  The final type of filling is porcelain. Porcelain is very common, and produced in lab where it will be matched to your teeth then bonded to the affected tooth. Porcelain fillings match the color of your teeth, and are resistant to any type of staining. The costs for porcelain fillings can be very expensive, some costing as much as gold fillings.

If a cavity, decay, or even a crack has managed to damage a large area of the tooth, you may need a crown or a cap. If the decay has managed to get to the nerve, you may end up needing a root canal to get rid of the dead pulp. When the dentist decides he can fill your tooth, he will remove the cavity then fill the hole with a material listed above. Depending on your insurance and what you can afford, you can choose which one you want or take his recommendation. In most cases, porcelain or composite fillings will be recommended. Gold fillings are popular, although most people want a filling that will match the natural color of their teeth.

Keep in mind that only a dentist can make the decision regarding fillings. When you visit for your routine checkup, the dentist will look in your mouth and use instruments that will let him examine the surfaces of your teeth. If he finds any cavities, he will usually recommend a filling. You won’t feel anything, as he will numb the area he is going to be filling. It normally takes less than an hour, and you’ll be up and at ‘em before you know it. A filling is great for cavities, as most look natural and they won’t result in the loss of your tooth.
Pasted from <http://www.loveableface.com/teeth%20includes%20files/TemporaryToothFilling.htm>

See demo videos at (this is a long website address):
<http://images.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http://i.ytimg.com/vi/nDHFCYrxUQ0/0.jpg&imgrefurl=http://modernhmong.com/home-dentistry-Putting-temporary-filling-in-tooth-cavity/K_v0pQF1INo.html&usg=__wF4cb6fLqJPrgonYQlyv1L_quWM=&h=360&w=480&sz=10&hl=en&start=120&sig2=5QQJFHyVvdpELkhn9QyByQ&zoom=1&itbs=1&tbnid=qDMKxlZco9xWdM:&tbnh=97&tbnw=129&prev=/images%3Fq%3Dmaking%2Ba%2Btemporary%2Bfilling%26start%3D100%26hl%3Den%26sa%3DN%26rlz%3D1T4GGLL_en%26ndsp%3D20%26tbs%3Disch:1&ei=ybh7TeH5MMaV0QGZkdjeAw>

B.   How to temporarily fix a loose dental crown
Buy a Dental Repair Kit at Walgreen’s or Amazon.com that consists of the adhesive and a little stylus.
This procedure is easy.

Things You’ll Need:
•  Dental Repair Kit
•  pointed knife or other sharp pointy object
•  crown
•  toothbrush
•  Dentemp or other dental temporary adhesive

Procedure
1.  For a loose crown. Remove crown and clean the crown and your tooth with a toothbrush.
2.  Take a pick or pointy knife and carefully remove all tooth and old dental adhesive product from the inside of the crown.
3.  Press crown back on tooth to make sure it will still fit. If it does not you are stuck and must wait till you can see your dentist. If it fits remove it and lightly fill inside of crown with the Dentemp or other temporary dental adhesive material.
4.  Press crown back on the wet tooth, press firmly. Then bite down a few times to make sure that it is a comfortable fit.
5.  If any of the Dentemp or dental adhesive material leaked out of the sides of the crown you will want to clean it up and remove it. Rinse mouth well with water.
6.  Most dental repair kits require that you do not eat anything for at least 1 hour after applying.
7.  For a lost filling or broken tooth. Brush tooth to remove any debris. Wash hands.
8.  Open canister of Dentemp or other temporary dental adhesive. remove a small amount of the Dentemp or other dental adhesive and form it into a small ball.
9.  Firmly press the little ball of Dentemp or other dental adhesive into the tooth that lost the filling and make sure to fill hole, bite down to insure it is comfortable.
10.  Remove any excess Dentemp or other dental adhesive, rinse mouth thoroughly, then Do Not eat for one hour to allow it to set firmly.
Pasted from <http://www.ehow.com/how_4845502_fix-loose-dental-crown.html>

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Home dental procedures

(Survival Manual/6. Medical/a) Dental)

Any dental emergency, like an injury to the teeth or gums can be potentially serious and should not be ignored. Ignoring a dental problem can increase the risk of permanent damage as well as the need for more extensive and expensive treatment down the road.

1.  Home exam
http://www.homedental.com/selfexam.asp

_A. Mouth Check
For many… pain was the major telltale sign that a dental appointment was needed. Bleeding gums were not a significant warning, because some people just didn’t know if they had cut their gums a little or what. Now, with the help of computers, we will be able to show you some of the warning signs, you, yourself, can see. Education is your best ally so you will easily know what you’re looking for. All you have to do, from time to time, is to take a look at our page and call a dentist when you see you’re having a problem.

Images above, L>R: L) Swollen gums, C) Cavities, R) Plaque and Tartar

If you see or think you see any of these conditions in your mouth or your child’s mouth, you will be smart by quickly making a dental appointment. Of course, prevention is always better than cure. If you know you have a condition that a dentist should treat, the sooner the better is always the best way to go.

_B.  Giving Plaque the Brush-Off
<http://corner-dental.olhblogspot.com/other-dental-news/taking-care-of-your-teeth/&gt;
In order to prevent cavities, you first need to remove plaque, the transparent layer of bacteria that coats the teeth. The best way to do this is by brushing your teeth twice a day and flossing at least once a day. Brushing also stimulates the gums, which helps to keep them healthy and prevent gum disease. Brushing and flossing are the most important things that you can do to keep your teeth and gums healthy.

Toothpastes contain abrasives, detergents, and foaming agents. Fluoride, the most common active ingredient in toothpaste, is what prevents cavities. So you should always be sure your toothpaste contains fluoride. If you have teeth that are sensitive to heat, cold, and pressure, you may want to try a special toothpaste for sensitive teeth.

_C.  Cleaning Tartar from your teeth
About 1 person in 10 has a tendency to accumulate tartar quickly. Tartar is plaque in a hardened form that is more damaging and difficult to remove. Using anti-tartar toothpastes and mouthwashes, as well as spending extra time brushing the teeth near the salivary glands (the inside of the lower front teeth and the outside of the upper back teeth) may slow the development of new tartar.

  1. Buy an antiseptic oral cleanser to help clean the tartar deposited from your  teeth. Gargle with this liquid every day, which will loosen the tartar from the edges of the gums. People should make it a habit to rinse their mouth with oral cleanser after each meal. This will remove the food particles which get stuck in the mouth after eating food.
  • After rinsing the mouth with an oral cleanser,  floss your teeth.
    It’s important to know the correct manner of flossing the teeth otherwise you can hurt your gums. People should floss their teeth thoroughly upwards and downwards. [I could never get my fingers in my mouth  just the right way to work the string version of dental floss,  so I use the dental floss picks shown at right. This brand has 90 picks per pouch which cost about $3.50 at Wal-Mart.]
  • If you eat lots of spicy foods, you’ll find it easier to remove tartar from your teeth. Spicy foods increase the production of saliva in the mouth. Saliva is very important to drain out those food particles which get stuck between teeth.
  • Rubbing your teeth with a mixture of salt and baking soda is very effective for removing tartar.
    Mix a small quantity of salt in baking soda and apply with a finger. The best thing about this method is that you can get instant results from it. It is one of the most effective home remedies for teeth tartar removal
    .

2.  Homemade tooth paste recipes
a)  Mix equal parts of baking soda and salt. The result tastes like dirt, but it does a decent job of cleaning your teeth and gums.
Simply moisten the toothbrush, dip it into the mixture and brush as usual.
Recipe from the book, Dirt Cheap Survival retreat by M.D.  Creekmore.

b) Two more recipes for  homemade toothpaste
http://naturallycheerful.blogspot.com/2011/09/homemade-toothpaste.html

Homemade Orange Toothpaste Recipe
1 tablespoon baking soda
⅛ teaspoon salt
3 tablespoon glycerin or  1- 1/2 tablespoon of peroxide
1 teaspoon orange extract or  ½ teaspoon dried orange*

Homemade Vanilla Toothpaste Recipe
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
4 teaspoons baking soda
1 teaspoon salt
1-2 teaspoons water, or peroxide to be added if desired

These store well in empty baby food jars.

*Place some grated orange rind in a blender and grind until it is fine and powdery.
or you could even use mint leaves if you like it minty.  Pretty much any kind of good tasting essential oils can be used as flavoring, just a couple drops though.  Easy does it.

NOTE: This is from the back of the ‘Arm & Hammer baking soda toothpaste tube’.
“Ingredients:
Active Ingredients: Sodium fluoride (0.24%) for anticavity.
Inactive Ingredients: Sodium bicarbonate, water, glycerin, sodium saccharin, PEG 8, flavor, cellulose gum, sodium lauryl sulfate, sodium lauroyl sarcosinate

You see the only things missing from the homemade toothpaste are:
1)  fluoride (which is bad for your bones),
2) lauryl sulfate (Google it. It is found contributing to the cause cancer and Alzheimer’s disease, it is not good for us in any form), and
3) saccharine (which is sugar), rubbing sugar on your teeth?
Go with homemade and avoid all the other garbage. Don’t take your health, including your dental health lightly.
..

3.  Summary of what to do for some common dental problems
<http://www.webmd.com/oral-health/guide/handling-dental-emergencies&gt;
_A. Toothache
First, thoroughly rinse your mouth with warm water. Use dental floss to remove any lodged food. If your mouth is swollen, apply a cold compress to the outside of your mouth or cheek. Never put aspirin or any other painkiller against the gums near the aching tooth because it may burn the gum tissue. See your dentist as soon as possible.

Tooth pain is one of the most painful types of discomforts known to man. Unlike other types of pain, that can be relieved with a temporary remedy, in most cases, tooth pain is something entirely different as it throbs consistently, is sensitive to hot or cold, or both and because you have to eat so you’re constantly irritating the painful area three times per day.

When you first experience tooth pain, your first instinct might be that you have food in between your teeth. If the pain is affecting your gums more than the tooth, then that is exactly what the pain will feel like. Around the infected area, check for any food that is stuck in small spaces. Do not try to aggravate the area by overly brushing or flossing, but gently use the brush or floss to get the food out.

1.   If you are able to stand warm liquid on the tooth, rinse your mouth out with warm salt water to help remove excess food. The wonderful benefit of warm salt water is that it can be done as often as you need to and it helps treat your gums.

2.   There are a number of ways to treat tooth pain that may or may not provide you with temporary relief. The most common ways of treating it is taking an anti-inflammatory drug, such as Advil, which
can be bought at most any store over the counter. This will help the pain and also help to ease the swelling and inflammation in the surrounding area. However, it’s still only a temporary relief.

3.   An ancient home remedy that might be very effective for your mouth pain is to use clove oil. Soak a cotton ball in the clove oil and then apply it directly to the tooth that is giving you trouble.  Clove oil has many soothing benefits, with the addition of infection fighting ingredients that can help relieve the pain and treat the area at the same time. If your tooth has a negative reaction to the clove oil and it causes the area to hurt worse, then rinse immediately with warm salt water. [Clove oil and q-tips should be maintained as part of your emergency medical supply kit. Mr. Larry]

Regardless of what type of temporary treatment you choose, it is still crucial that you visit the dentist as soon as possible. Even if you are able to find a home remedy that relieves the pain, there could still be a serious problem with your tooth that will need to be treated appropriately. Make sure that you inform the dentist of any pain relieving methods that you tried at home.

_B.  Toothache remedies that you can easily find

  1. A clove of garlic is good. Garlic is a natural anti-biotic. It attacks bacteria and has been known in many instances to work on bacterial infections all on its own without the use of prescribed
    antibiotics. Crush the garlic, and place it in the cavity. It will sting for a few seconds going in, but it settles the pain before long. If you want it to work even better, prepare a strong salt solution and swish the area to get rid of any debris that may be lying around, and then place the clove there. The pain will go, and you may not even need to see a dentist
  2. An onion will work in the same way – it  will kill bacteria and leave you free of pain. Treat it the same way you would the garlic – pound and pack the cavity. If you’re not in too much pain to chew, chew it and take around your mouth, letting it linger around where you have the pain.
  3. Wheatgrass is also excellent. If you can chew it, go ahead and chew it. If you can’t, find a way to crush it and pack it around the painful area. It acts as a strong, natural mouthwash, and it draws out bacteria from both the gum surface and the teeth.
  4. Clove oil has strong antiseptic properties. If you can get hold of some, pour a couple of drops directly into the cavity. If you can’t, crush a clove and pack it against the cavity or get the juice in there.
  5. Activated charcoal can be bought in some pharmacies now, and is good for aching cavities. Just crush it into a paste, pack it into gauze and hold it against the painful cavity. It should take away the pain.

The long term solution for cavities though, is to have your dentist have a look and recommend a permanent course of action – remember that sometimes even filling cavities may not be a permanent solution. Taking regular extra-good care of your teeth if you have cavities is one way to make sure that you get toothaches less frequently. Otherwise, keep all the above handy; you never know when you’ll need them.

_C.  Chipped or broken teeth. Save any pieces. Rinse the mouth using warm water; rinse any broken pieces. If there’s bleeding, apply a piece of gauze to the area for about 10 minutes or until the bleeding stops. Apply a cold compress to the outside of the mouth, cheek, or lip near the broken/ chipped tooth to keep any swelling down and relieve pain. See your dentist as soon as possible.

_D.  Knocked-out tooth. Retrieve the tooth, hold it by the crown (the part that is usually exposed in the mouth), and rinse off the tooth root with water if it’s dirty. Do not scrub it or remove any attached tissue fragments. If possible, try to put the tooth back in place. Make sure it’s facing the right way. Never force it into the socket. If it’s not possible to reinsert the tooth in the socket, put the tooth in a small container of milk (or cup of water that contains a pinch of table salt, if milk is not available) or a product containing cell growth medium, such as Save-a-Tooth. In all cases, see your dentist as quickly as possible. Knocked out teeth with the highest chances of being saved are those seen by the dentist and returned to their socket within 1 hour of being knocked out.
__1)  Extruded (partially dislodged) tooth. See your dentist right away. Until you reach your dentist’s office, to relieve pain, apply a cold compress to the outside of the mouth or cheek in the affected area. Take an over-the-counter pain reliever (such as Tylenol or Advil) if needed.
__2)  Objects caught between teeth. First, try using dental floss to very gently and carefully remove the object. If you can’t get the object out, see your dentist. Never use a pin or other sharp object to poke at the stuck object. These instruments can cut your gums or scratch your tooth surface.

_E.  Possible Broken Jaw
If you think that your jaw might be broken, apply a cold compress to the area to minimize any swelling. You will need to see your dentist immediately or go to the emergency room of a nearby hospital.

_F.  Lost filling. (See Survival Manual/6. Medical/a) Dental/Temporary Filling & Crown post) As a temporary measure, stick a piece of sugarless gum into the cavity (sugar-filled gum will cause pain) or use an over-the-counter dental cement. See your dentist as soon as possible.

_G.  Lost crown. (See Survival Manual/6. Medical/a) Dental/Temporary Filling & Crown doc) If the crown falls off, make an appointment to see your dentist as soon as possible and bring the crown with you. If you can’t get to the dentist right away and the tooth is causing pain, use a cotton swab to apply a little clove oil to the sensitive area (clove oil can be purchased at Amazon.com, your local drug store, or in the spice aisle of your grocery store). If possible, slip the crown back over the tooth. Before doing so, coat the inner surface with an over-the-counter dental cement, toothpaste, or denture adhesive, to help hold the crown in place. Do not use super glue!

_H.  Broken braces wires. If a wire breaks or sticks out of a bracket or band and is poking your cheek, tongue, or gum, try using the eraser end of a pencil to push the wire into a more comfortable position. If you can’t reposition the wire, cover the end with orthodontic wax, a small cotton ball, or piece of gauze until you can get to your orthodontist’s office. Never cut the wire, as you could end up swallowing it or breathing it into your lungs.

_I.  Loose brackets and bands. Temporarily reattach loose braces with a small piece of orthodontic wax. Alternatively, place the wax over the braces to provide a cushion. See your orthodontist as soon as possible. If the problem is a loose band, save it and call your orthodontist for an appointment to have it recemented or replaced (and to have missing spacers replaced).

_J.  Abscess . Abscesses are infections that occur around the root of a tooth or in the space between the teeth and gums. Abscesses are a serious condition that can damage tissue and surrounding teeth, with the infection possibly spreading to other parts of the body if left untreated.

Because of the serious oral health and general health problems that can result from an abscess, see your dentist as soon as possible if you discover a pimple-like swelling on your gum that usually is painful. In the meantime, to ease the pain and draw the pus toward the surface, try rinsing your mouth with a mild salt water solution (1/2 teaspoon of table salt in 8 ounces of water) several times a day.

_K.  Soft-tissue injuries. Injuries to the soft tissues, which include the tongue, cheeks, gums, and lips, can result in bleeding. To control the bleeding, here’s what to do:

  1. Rinse your mouth with a mild salt-water solution.
  2. Use a moistened piece of gauze or tea bag to apply pressure to the bleeding site. Hold in place for 15 to 20 minutes.
  3. To both control bleeding and relieve pain, hold a cold compress to the outside of the mouth or cheek in the affected area for 5 to 10 minutes.
  4. If the bleeding doesn’t stop, see your dentist right away or go to a hospital emergency room. Continue to apply pressure on the bleeding site with the gauze until you can be seen and treated.

_L.  Bitten Tongue or Lip
If you have  bitten your tongue or lip, gently wipe the area clean with a cloth. Apply a cold compress to the area to minimize any swelling. If the bleeding will not stop, you should go to the emergency room of a nearby hospital.

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Emergency home dental kit

(Survival Manual/6. Medical/a) Dental/Home dental kit)

A.  Guide to Emergency Dental Kits (Buy as kit or as individual items)
One of the common themes with dental emergencies is that, the quicker you get treatment, the better long-term prospects that treatment will usually have. Therefore, if you have a tooth knocked out, that tooth can often be saved if you get to the dentist quickly enough. Assuming of course, that you have picked up the tooth and brought it with you!
As more and more people are realising the benefits of early treatment, emergency dental repair kits are becoming far more popular. Emergency Dental Kits are a relatively new phenomena. These are kits that you can buy over the counter in pharmacies and supermarkets and which contain a wide variety of dental treatments for emergency situations.
Essentially, an emergency dental kit will give you the opportunity to effect some preliminary care before going to the dentist. An emergency kit will not give you the materials you need to treat yourself properly. However, it may just mean you can patch yourself up enough to stop the pain, protect your teeth and get professional treatment.
(Internet image above, cover of the book: Where There Is No Dentist by Murray Dickson, 228Pgs. Recommended for reading and inclusion in your library. Amazon.com)

B.  What can be treated with a dental repair kit?
A dental repair kit is not intended to be used to perform permanent repairs. The majority of over-the-counter kits will include materials that are lower grade than your dentist would use. Therefore, materials such as dental cements will only stay in place for a short period of time. However, your dental kits can be used effectively for temporary treatment in a number of different scenarios:
Experiencing toothache: you may be suffering from toothache caused by a cavity which you cannot see or reach. Your dental kit will usually include some clove oil and cotton wool. Clove oil contains eugenol, which is a powerful natural pain-killer. Dilute it with some olive oil and soak the cotton wool, then bite down on the cotton wool with your affected tooth. This should help soothe the pain.

•  Losing a tooth: your mouth is full of blood vessels so, sometimes, when you lose a tooth the cavity can bleed quite heavily. Your dental repair kit will contain cotton wool balls that you can use to staunch the flow of blood. It may also contain some pain-killing gel that can be used to soothe sore, tender and inflamed gums.
•  Losing a filling: we all lose fillings from time to time and a lost fillings can mean that your tooth becomes immediately very sensitive to hot and cold. Some dentists recommend sticking sugar-free gum over the cavity until you can get professional dental treatment. Your dental kit, however, will include dental cement that can be used to cover the cavity. This will also help to stop debris getting trapped in the cavity, irritating the tooth and therefore causing more pain.
•  Fracturing a tooth or losing a crown: if the structure of your tooth is weakened by decay, then the tooth can split or crack unexpectedly. This can of course be painful and it requires immediate professional treatment. In your emergency dental kit, you will usually find a temporary crown and dental cement. This crown can be used to cover the broken tooth and protect it from further damage until you can get to your dentist.
•  Breaking a denture: many people who wear dentures find that keeping an emergency dental kit handy is useful. Dentures can easily be damaged, cracked or broken and, when this happens, it can be uncomfortable and embarrassing to have to manage without them. An emergency dental kit will include orthodontic wax that can help to smooth the edges of damaged dentures. You may also be able to use dental cement to make minor, temporary repairs to broken dentures.

C.  Make your own dental repair kit
Of course, you do not necessarily have to go out and buy a branded dental repair kit. With a little bit of research, you can learn more about the kinds of products that are useful and put together your own pack. In many ways, spending a bit of time getting to know different items will mean you are more likely to know what to reach for when the pressure is on!
•  Clove Oil: Clove oil is used prominently in dental care, in products like mouthwashes and tooth pastes. Clove oil has pain killing properties which help it to soothe tooth aches, inflamed gums and sores such as mouth ulcers. It can also help keep the breath fresh and you can easily buy it in your local chemist or natural health store.
•  Dental Floss: Dentists recommend that you floss regularly. Even if you do not, you should still keep some dental floss in the house. It is useful for removing items or debris that become stuck in your teeth.
•  Antiseptic mouthwash: There are different types of mouthwash available. However, a mouthwash that contains antiseptic can help to clean blood away from a wound or to wash away debris from a shattered filling, for example.
•  Cotton wool: Whether you need to staunch the flow of blood or stop a filling from hurting, the patient often needs to bite down on something. So keep plenty of cotton wool in your kit, as this does the job perfectly.
•  Pain Killing gel: There are a number of pain killing gels available on the market under different brand names. These gels are appropriate for a number of different purposes, from soothing teething pain in children to relieving the pain from canker sores in adults. They can also help with pain caused by ill-fitting dentures.
These are the basics of any home dental emergency kit. Of course, there are many more items that you could potentially add to it. However, it is important that you strike the right balance between equipping yourself for emergencies and ensuring that you know when to call your dentist.

D.  Commercial Emergency Dental Kit
Amazon.com price: ~$28 with S&H
Dental module supplies and complete instruction manual for treating dental emergencies in the field. Module comes heat sealed in a resealable bag for easy access and storage.

Contents:
1  Mouth Mirror
1  Dental floss, 12 yd
3  Orasol Packet
1  Clove Oil (Eugenol)
1  Wax Stick
1  DenTemp (Zinc Oxide & Clove Oil)
1  Spatula
10  Cotton Pellets
3  Gauze Dressing, 3″x3″, 2’s
1  ActCel  Hemostatic Gauze, 2″x2″
5  Cotton Rolls
1  Tweezers
4  Toothpicks
8  Ibuprofen, 200 mg Tablet
2  Nitrile Gloves, Large
2  Nitrile Gloves, Medium
1  Hazardous Waste Bag
1  Instructions

E.  Pain Relief for Tooth Aches
•  Ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin)The best over-the-counter painkillers for toothache are non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs including ibuprofen. Ibuprofen is sold under many brand names, but the most common are Advil and Motrin. Dentists often prescribe 800mg Ibuprofen every four (4) to six (6) hours as an alternative to narcotic pain relievers.
•  Acetaminophen (Tylenol) or even aspirin are also pretty good for dental painkiller. However, dental pain often comes from inflammation and pressure on various tissues and nerves of the face. Ibuprofen can be better for dental pain because they are both pain relievers and good anti-inflammatories, vs. Tylenol-acetaminophen, which is only a pain reliever.
•  If a cavity is causing your toothache, rinse your mouth with warm water and use a toothpick to remove food from the cavity. Soak a piece of cotton with oil of cloves and pack it into the cavity, but avoid getting any oil on your tongue.
•  Tip: “If your pain is from nerve damage and you are getting the spontaneous night pain try sleeping in a sitting position. The nerve and pulp chamber doesn’t get filled with fluid and blood and usually u don’t get that throbbing pain.
•  If the pain is from a broken tooth and you have an exposed nerve, if the nerve is still relatively healthy just covering it up will cause a great amount of relief. Take a piece of sugerless chewing gum chewed up and cover the nerve and tooth, it should help alot. I have had patients try it all to cover the nerve, shove cardboard in their tooth, air plane glue trying to seal the tooth, etc. but the sugarless chewing gum is your best temporary solution.”

Tooth Sensitivity and Pain
Pain, especially to cold things, can also be caused by exposed dentine – the inner substance of the tooth, which is covered by enamel. The enamel can get quite thin, especially where the tooth meets the root (at the gumline). The root is covered by a substance called cementum, which is easily worn away. Dentine contains little tunnels (tubules) that link to the nerves on the inside of the tooth, and when dentine is exposed, these nerves are easily stimulated, resulting in pain.
•  Desensitizing agents such as Sensodyne work by blocking off the tubules, so that the nerves don’t get stimulated. Sensodyne doesn’t work that well used as a toothpaste. It works a lot better by gently massaging it into the sore spot with a finger. Do NOT rinse it off with water or mouthwash. It may take several weeks before the desired effect is reached. Sensodyne can be used indefinitely. The warning on the US packet not to use Sensodyne for more than a month is a legal requirement, designed so that people won’t put off seeing a dentist when something might be seriously wrong. There are no actual health reasons for not using Sensodyne long-term
•  QuickStix Oral Pain Swabs (topical anaesthetic): Contains 20% Benzocaine for maximum pain. Also safe to treat canker sores and sore gums. Using the swab tip, apply a small amount of medication to the affected area including the surrounding gum or oral tissue. Use up to 4 times daily or as directed by a doctor or dentist. Caution: Don’t use this product continuously. Do not use if you have a history of allergy to local anesthetics such as procaine, butacaine, benzocaine, or other “caine” anesthetics.
Please note that such products are meant to be temporary measures – so don’t expect them to last long (4-5 days if you’re VERY lucky).

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How to pull a tooth

medical iconA.  How to Extract a Tooth
3 October 2012, DoomAndBloom.com, by Joseph Alton, M.D. (Dr. Bones)
Pasted from: http://www.doomandbloom.net/how-to-extract-a-tooth/

Many of our readers are often surprised that a medical doctor and nurse devote a portion of their writing to dental issues. Few people who are otherwise medically prepared seem to devote much time to dental health. History, however, tells us that problems with teeth take up a significant portion of the medic’s patient load.  In the Vietnam War, medical personnel noted that fully half of those who reported to daily sick call came with dental complaints.  In a long-term survival situation, you might find yourself as dentist as well as nurse or doctor.

The basis of modern dentistry is to save every tooth if at all possible.  In the old days (not biblical times, I mean 50 years ago), the main treatment for a diseased tooth was extraction.  If we find ourselves in a collapse situation, that’s how it will be in the future. If you delay extracting a tooth because it “isn’t that bad yet”, it will likely get worse. It could spread to other teeth or cause an infection that could spread to your bloodstream (called “sepsis”) and cause major damage.  Like it or not, a survival medic, will eventually find himself or herself in a situation where you have to remove a diseased tooth.

Tooth extraction is not an enjoyable experience as it is, and will be less so in a long-term survival situation with no power and limited supplies.  Unlike baby teeth, a permanent tooth is unlikely to be removed simply by wiggling it out with your (gloved) hand or tying a string to it and the nearest doorknob and slamming. Knowledge of the procedure, however, will be important for anyone expecting to be the medical caregiver in the aftermath of a major disaster.

toothextract1

Before we go any further, I have to inform you that I am not a dentist, just an old country doctor.  Please note that this is an introductory article, and that tooth extraction can be a complex procedure. Also note:  It is illegal and punishable by law to practice dentistry without a license.  The lack of formal training or experience in dentistry may cause complications that are much worse than a bum tooth. If you have access to modern dental care, seek it out.

The anatomy of the tooth is relatively simple for such an important part of our body, and is worth reviewing.  The part of the tooth that you see above the gum line is called the “crown”.  Below it, you have the “root”.  The bony socket that the tooth resides in is called the “alveolus”.  Teeth are anchored to the alveolar bone with ligaments, just like you have ligaments holding together your ankle or shoulder.

The tooth is composed of different materials:
Enamel:  The hard white external covering of the tooth crown.
Dentin:  bony yellowish material under the enamel, and surrounding the pulp.
Pulp: connective tissue with blood vessels and nerves endings in the central portion of the tooth.

toothextract2To extract a permanent tooth, you will, at the very least, need the following: A dental extraction forceps (#150A is a good general one for uppers a d #151 is reasonable for lowers; they get much more specialized for each type of tooth, however).

A periosteal (meaning “around the bone”) elevator instrument to loosen the ligaments holding the tooth in place. A typical dental elevator (see above) Gauze or cotton rolls or squares and a “pickup” forceps or tweezers. A very cooperative patient or a good local anesthetic.

Proper positioning will help you perform the procedure more easily. For an upper extraction (also called “maxillary extraction”), the patient should be tipped at a 60 degree angle to the floor and the patient’s mouth should be at the level of the medic’s elbow.  For a lower extraction, (also called a “mandibular extraction”), the patient should be sitting upright with the level of the mouth lower than the elbow.  For right-handed medics, stand to the right of the patient; for left-handers, stand to the left.  For uppers and most front lower extractions, it is best to position yourself in front.  For lower molars, some prefer to position themselves somewhat behind the patient.

To begin with, you will want to wash your hands and put on gloves, a face mask, and some eye protection. Floss the teeth and give the patient an antibacterial rinse.  Keep the area around the tooth as dry as possible, so that you can see what you’re doing.  There will be some bleeding, so have cotton balls or rolled gauze squares available.  These may have to be changed from time to time if you place them between the cheek and gum.

toothextract3

The teeth are held in place in their sockets by ligaments, which are fibrous connective tissue.  These ligaments must be severed to loosen the tooth with an elevator, which looks like a  small chisel.  Go between the tooth in question and the gum on all sides and apply a small amount of pressure to get down to the root area.  This should loosen the tooth and expand the bony socket.  Expect some bleeding.

Take your extraction forceps and grasp the tooth as far down the root as possible.  This will give you the best chance of removing the tooth in its entirety the first time.   For front teeth (which have 1 root), exert pressure straight downward for uppers and straight upward for lowers, after first loosening the tooth with your elevator.  For teeth with more than 1 root, such as molars, a rocking motion will help loosen the tooth further as you extract.

Once loose, avoid damage to neighboring teeth by extracting towards the cheek (or lip, for front teeth) rather than towards the tongue.  This is best for all but the lower molars that are furthest back.

toothextract4

Use your other hand to support the mandible (lower jaw) in the case of lower extractions. If the tooth breaks during extraction (not uncommon), you will have to remove the remaining root.  Use your elevator to further loosen the root and help push it outward.

Afterwards, place a folded gauze on the bleeding socket and have the patient bite down. Occasionally, a suture may be required if bleeding is heavy.   In a recent Cuban study, veterinary super glue (N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate) was used in over 100 patients in this circumstance with good success in controlling both bleeding and pain.  Dermabond has been used in some cases in the U.S. for temporary pain relief, but more research is needed.

Expect some swelling, pain, and even bruising over the next few days.  Cold packs will decrease swelling for the first 24-48 hours; afterwards, use warm compresses to help with the inevitable jaw stiffness. Also, consider antibiotics, as infection is a possible complication.  Liquids and a diet of soft foods should be given to decrease trauma to the area.

toothextract5

Use non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medicine such as Ibuprofen for pain.  Some recommend staying away from aspirin, as it may hinder blood clotting in the socket.

The blood clot is your friend, so make sure not to smoke, spit, or even use straws; the pressure effect might dislodge it, which could cause a painful condition called Alveolar Osteitis or “dry socket”.  You will see that the clot is gone and may notice a foul odor in the person’s breath.

Antibiotics and warm salt water gargles are useful here, and a solution of water with a small amount of Clove oil may serve to decrease the pain.  Don’t use too much clove oil, as it could burn the mouth.

In a long-term survival situation, difficult decisions will have to be made. If modern dentistry is gone due to a mega-catastrophe, the survival medic will have to take on that role just as he/she may have to take on the role of medical caregiver. Performing dental procedures without training and experience, however, is a bad idea in any other scenario.  Never perform a dental procedure on someone for any reason, if you have modern dental care available to you.

Dr. Bones

Here are some very useful links and references:
Molar extraction:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OjiBOOhVVNo

Slideshow on extraction techniques – important to review:
http://www.slideshare.net/DrAbusallamah/simple-extraction-technique

An extraction performed at Mt. Everest base camp – note positioning of the dentist, use of the opposite hand for support,  and improvisations:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o_DPqhQl4AM 

Guide to extraction forceps and procedures:
http://www.physicsforceps.com/

Prepper Barbie:
Reply October 3, 2012
“Upper molars generally have 3 roots, 2 on the outside/cheek side, and 1 on the inside…like a tripod. Keep this in mind while loosening. Don’t rush the loosening process, this is the most important part of the extraction. If you have trouble stopping bleeding, bite on a moistened regular tea bag for about 45 minutes. Do not extract a tooth if you are on a blood thinning medication…this includes many “G” herbs such as Ginko and Ginseng…stop those meds or herbs for at least 5 days prior to extracting. Warm salt water rinses the next day…a pinch of salt in an 8oz glass. After that, antibacterial rinses”

Michael Camp
“you can buy lidocane on line, the injectable solution, but you have to be careful using it, there are or can be problems related to the use of lidocane, but I think it is essential when working on teeth.”

Dr Bones
Reply December 15, 2012
“The issue with lidocaine is that accidental injection directly into a blood vessel may cause heart arrhythmia and seizures. Always aspirate the plunger of the syringe before injecting; if blood enters the syringe, pull out and try again.”

 

 B.  How To Pull A Tooth in a SHTF/TEOTWAWKI
25 Nov 2011, gunsnet.net, by Mark Ducati
Pasted from: http://www.gunsnet.net/showthread.php?14094-How-To-Pull-A-Tooth-in-a-SHTF-TEOTWAWKI

I thought I’d pass on a little knowledge that might help you guys if the SHTF…
First off, dental anesthetic and syringes. You’re probably not going to have any. But holding a shot of strong whiskey (do NOT use Isopropyl/rubbing alcohol) or ethanol over the tooth for 5 minutes may help dull the pain a little bit. Even holding a cotton ball soaked with Oragel or Anbesol may give some relief (these contain Benzocaine). Another old fashioned dental anesthetic is good ‘ol “Clove Oil”.

Unless you can inject an anesthetic at the nerve, you will not achieve 100% profound anesthesia… the above methods might give you 10-15% at best, but its better than nothing in a crisis when out in the field.

 2% Lidocaine with 1:100,000 Epinephrine is probably the gold standard of dental anesthetics (we haven’t used “Novocaine” brand anesthetic in dentistry for almost 60 years now, too many allergic reactions).
IF you have access to a syringe, in a pinch, you can use liquid Diphenhydramien (benadryl), for an adult, no more than 100mg’s. Injecting Benedryl does have some anesthetic properties, estimated about 50%.

Another substance you can use in lieu of dental anesthetic is Ethanol (EtOH) alcohol… I don’t know how much that would “burn/sting” while being injecting, but it works by literally chemically cauderizing the nerve… it works, but the damage to the never can take several months to repair. Sometimes patients will have a permanent “paraesthesia”, that is, the numbness never wears off.

So, no anesthetic and holding alcohol, anbesol/oragel, or clove oil over the tooth isn’t enough to make the tooth comfortable enough to extract it… sometimes waiting, living in pain will help…. assuming you survive the spreading abcess.

As the infection/abcess progresses, this is nature’s way of trying to get rid of the tooth… the periodontal ligament becomes inflamed and during the inflammatory process the bone around the root starts to soften up… the tooth then starts to become increasingly mobile. Enough that you can either grab hold of it with your fingers to wiggle it out, or it will literally fall out all of its own accord.

Forceps: even though dental forceps may look like some fancy pliers… posterior teeth are hard to get “pliers” on as most people can’t open wide enough to get the pliers on the tooth perpendicular to the roots long axis. Secondly, hardware pliers have sharp corners on them that can score/cleave the enamel/root structure increasing the chance that the tooth will break. Dental forceps have rounded edges and have a curved contour on the beaks to engage the tooth to minimize cracking/breaking it. The head/beaks of the forceps are also specifically angled in regards to removing a tooth on top or bottom. Typically, a general maxillary (top) forcep is called a 150 Forcep and the one for the mandibular arch (bottom) is a 151 Forcep.

When grasping a tooth, even though the forceps may resemble pliers… NEVER “pull” a tooth! You “push” a tooth instead. Think of it like removing a fence post or tree stump out of the ground… put a chain around it, hook it to your bobcat and pull straight up, more often than not, the post/stump is going to break. So, you push the post/stump to one side, then the other, back and forth, again and again gradually loosening the soil to gently remove it.

Same for a tooth. Unfortunately, looking at an x-ray or in the mouth, you can’t tell if that tooth is in Rock, Clay, or soft Topsoil. As a general statement, front teeth are easier to luxate (push/wiggle) back and forth than the back teeth and the top teeth are generally easier to remove than the bottom teeth because the bone on top is softer.

So here’s what I do, I first start with an “elevator” which is kind of like a screw driver with curved tip and rounded on one side while the other side is flat. I stick that between the teeth first and rotate the edge of elevator against the tooth which I wish to remove, fulcruming off the bone and the adjacent tooth. This starts the process of loosening the tooth:

toothextract6

toothextract7

 Then you switch to your Forceps (150 for the top, 151 for the bottoms). The forceps usually cost about $50-60 bucks a piece… there is no regulation against a non-dental person owning them. But you have to buy them from a dental supply company. I’d be willing to bet that if you asked your dentist nicely, they would order some for you at cost if you explained your preparedness for SHTF.

toothextract8

Back to the “pushing”… the first thing I do is get the forceps on the tooth, I seat the beaks as far down on the root as I can get them, then I push “luxate” the tooth facially towards the cheek with steady pressure and hold that pressure for about a minute. Then I push the tooth in the other direction, towards the lingual and hold that pressure again for another minute. Then we go back and forth like this for about 5-10 minutes and then usually the tooth is loose enough that you can wiggle it out like wiggling out or removing a stuck/tight drawer.

toothextract9

On a front tooth that has a round and straight root, not only do I push the tooth facially and lingually, but I often will rotate the tooth clockwise and counter clockwise like a cork screw:

toothextracr10

Now… what to do if you get the tooth out and the root breaks? Unless you’ve got a drill, root tip pick, and good light source, you’re going to have to leave the broken root tip in place… the majority of the tooth nerve is located in the coronal aspect of the tooth (the part of the tooth visible in the mouth) in the pulp chamber… if you break a root tip off, in most cases the body will “encapsulate” the root tip and it should be fine. As a general statement, in a dental office, the standard of care require that all root tips be removed, and if I can’t get it, I am obligated to refer to an oral surgeon. But I can’t tell you how many broken root tips I’ve seen on x-rays that are just fine.

You’ll likely need to follow up with an antibiotic for a week as well.

Anyway, in war, the #1 casualty is tooth related and in a SHTF scenario, I imagine dental related problems to be of great concern as well.

These are the basics of tooth removal in 5 minutes…. I suggest that you search youtube.com and watch a few videos on dental extractions for further clarification.
I hope this info may be of some use to you and also hope you’ll never need it.

 

C. How to Extract a Tooth at Home
eHow, by Charlotte Johnson, eHow Contributor
Pasted from: http://www.ehow.com/how_5057475_extract-tooth-home.html

Tooth extraction is a procedure that can be done at home. You should know, however, that there are pros and cons. The pro of at-home extraction is avoiding the cost of a visit to the dentist. The con is the tooth possibly could break off, you might not be addressing potential infection and/or abscess and there may be more pain involved since you probably don’t have the same training and tools a dentist does.

Things You’ll Need:
•  Gauze
•  Pain reliever (optional)

 Instructions
1 . Determine the looseness the tooth. If the tooth is not loose at all, you are in for an extremely difficult extraction; it would be best in this situation to call the dentist. If the tooth is loose–especially if it’s dangling–you will have a greater chance of pulling it successfully with minimum pain. Baby teeth and teeth that are loose due to gum disease are easiest to extract.

2 . Brush your teeth to make sure any extra food particles are out of the way. If you are not able to do this, swish water in your mouth and spit it back out a few times.
 3.  Grasp the tooth by using a small square of gauze. Pull firmly. If the tooth does not come out fairly quickly, you may want to stop this process and seek a dentist’s help. Continuing to pull on a firmly embedded tooth may aggravate it and cause you a considerable amount of pain.

4. Rinse and spit a few more times once the tooth is out. Hold a clean piece of gauze next to the gum where the tooth came out for a few minutes to help stop the bleeding. If the bleeding continues, is very heavy, or if you have significant pain, call a dentist. Otherwise, you can treat the soreness with over-the-counter medication.

5. Monitor your mouth and body for signs of infection. If you notice redness and swelling at the site of extraction, if there is a foul smell or pus in or near the tooth cavity or if you generally feel bad and have a fever, call a dentist. If infection begins, make sure you receive any necessary antibiotics so your condition doesn’t worsen.

Tips & Warnings
Warning: Most dentists advise strongly against pulling your own teeth or the teeth of others due to the chances of complications.

Excerpt pasted from: http://www.tufts.edu/med/apua/news/15_1a.html
Antibiotics are prescribed for oral conditions related to endodontic, oral surgical, and periodontal manifestations. The antibiotic prescribed most frequently is penicillin or an analog, especially amoxicillin.

(Survival Manual/6. Medical/ a) Dental/ How to pull a tooth)

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Antibiotics for TEOTWAWKI

(Survival Manual/ 6. Medical/d) Medicine & supplement/ Antibiotics for TEOTWAWKI)

Medical advice
The information, ideas, and suggestions in the 4dtraveler.net blog are not intended as a substitute for professional advice. Before following any suggestions contained in this post, you should consult your personal physician. Neither the author or Word Press shall be liable or responsible for any loss or damage allegedly arising as a consequence of your use or application of any information or suggestions in this blog.
.

I.  Emergency Antibiotics for TEOTWAWKI
Ampicillin, Amoxicillin, Doxycycline, Tetracycline, Azithromycin and their non prescription, pharmaceutical grade forms

A.  Ampicillin
Ampicillin is a wide spectrum antibiotic in the penicillin group of drugs. It fights bacteria in your body and is used to treat many different types of infections caused by bacteria, such as  lungs (pneumonia),  infections of the middle ear, tonsils, throat, larynx (laryngitis), bronchi (bronchitis), sinuses, stomach and intestines, bladder infections, urinary tract, skin infections, kidney caused by susceptible bacteria, E. coli or salmonella infection. It also is used for treating uncomplicated gonorrhea, meningitis, endocarditis and other serious infections.
Preparations: Capsules: 250 and 500 mg. Powder oral suspension: 125 and 250 mg/5mL.
* Amazon.com: Fish Cillin (Ampicillin) 250 mg – 100 Caps, $27.97 free S&H

Product Features
Standard pharmacy quality Ampicillin antibiotic.
Labeled for use in fish tanks, in pull apart capsules for easy use – 250 mg. strength

Product Description
Fish Cillin exerts a bactericidal action on gram positive and some gram negative bacteria. Useful for control of some common bacterial diseases of fish including Aeromonas and Pseudomonsa denera and Mysobbacterial group (gill diseases & chondrococcus). Directions: Add contents of one capsule (250 mg) into aquarium for each 10 gallons of water to be treated. While duration of treatment depends on type and severity of infection, it is recommended that extended medication baths continue for a minimum of 5 days and for not more than 10 days. Discontinue treatment if no improvement is noted within 5 days.

 Customer reviews
1) Pharmacy Grade Product, January 11, 2011
By moonjogger (MI)
This review is from: Fish Cillin (Ampicillin 250 mg) – 100 Caps (Misc.)
“This is an excellent product. Is all 100% sealed and is Usp grade antibiotic. Manufacturer is West-ward Pharmisuiticals of New Jersery. This very same tablet is what Walgreens and Rite aid are despensing for their Generics. OF COURSE, I was thrilled that my fish would not suffer from any kind of ill effects from any kind of odd fillers or additives that may have been added. Fish are very sensitive to any kind of changes in their enviourment. Thus I am 100 % confident in the Knowing that all are safe with this Antibiotic.”

2) SAVED MY DOG’S LIFE., November 1, 2007
By Lavern A. W. (Ohio This review is from: Fish Cillin (Ampicillin 250 mg) – 100 Caps
I WISH I WOULD HAVE FOUND THESE EARLIER. I lost my Scotty (12 years old and Sheppard 13 years old in 2006). The vet could not save them. It cost a lot of money and no dogs to show for it. When my Scottie’s twin sister got sick in April of 2007 I gave her four tablets a day and on the fourth day she started to eat again. This was the same time that the tainted dog food was happening. I still have her and she was 13 in July and this is November. Plus I saved hundred of dollars in vet bill and have a dog to show for it.
.

 B.  Amoxicillin
Amoxicillin is a penicillin group antibiotic. It fights bacteria in your body.
Amoxicillin is used to treat many different types of infections caused by bacteria, such as ear infections, ear/nose/throat (upper respiratory infections) bladder and urninary tract infections, pneumonia, gonorrhea, and E. coli or salmonella infection. Amoxicillin is also sometimes used together with another antibiotic called clarithromycin (Biaxin) to treat stomach ulcers caused by Helicobacter pylori infection. This combination is sometimes used with a stomach acid reducer called lansoprazole (Prevacid).
Preparations: Capsules: 250 and 500 mg. Tablets: 500 and 875 mg. Chewable tablets: 125, 200, 250, and 400 mg.
1.   Fish Mox (Amoxicillin) 250mg, 100 Capsules, $14.99
2.   Amazon.com: Fish Mox (Amoxicillin) 250mg, 100 Capsules, $16.28 + free shipping.
_a)  Standard pharmacy quality Amoxicillin antibiotic
_b)  Labeled for use in fish tanks, in pull apart capsules for easy use – 250 mg. strength

 Product Description
Fish-Mox exerts a bactericidal action on gram positive and some gram negative bacteria. Useful for control of some common bacterial diseases of fish including aeromonas and pseudomonas genera and mysobacterial group (gill diseases, chondrococcus).

Add contents of one capsule (250 mg) into aquarium for each 10 gallons  of water to be treated. It is recommended that extended medication baths continue for a minimum of 5 days & for not more than 10 days. Discontinue treatment if no improvement is noted within 5 days.
 _a) [10 gallons  water per 250mg Fish-Mox * 8.3 pounds per gallon water =83 pounds of water per 250mg Fish-Mox capsule,
_b) there fore, 500mg Fish-Mox per 166 pounds water, ie. pounds body weight.]

Customer reviews
‘For most infections, the dosage weight of this drug is 500mg for an average 160-200 lbs adult, taken 2 to 3 times a day. Take a total of 1 Gram (1000  mg) per day, using 500mg Fish Mox that would be two pills a day. Water mass is considered in determining dosage, since this is a Penicillin class of drug. You can double the dosage for short-term, serious infections. A bottle should cost $25 for 100 Pills. It’s a human grade pharmaceutical medication, the same pills humans take.’ Pasted from http://www.godlikeproductions.com/forum1/message813524/pg1>

1)  Review of product “Fish Mox“, February 11, 2007
By Cathy F. Elkiss (Gettysburg, PA USA This review is from: Fish Mox (Amoxicillin) 250mg, 100 Capsules (Misc.)
“I run a sanctuary for abandoned and homeless cats in my community, and I like to keep a supply of amoxicillin and ampicillin on hand for treating the occasional upper respiratory infections to which these animals are prone. They are both excellent products – safe, inexpensive, easy to use and most important, effective. Thank you! Cathy Elkiss”
2)  It’s The Real Stuff!!, April 17, 2009
By A.A.Roxx (PA) This review is from: Fish Mox (Amoxicillin) 250mg, 100 Capsules (Misc.)
“I had a bad sinus infection, tried to get a doctors appointment and was told I had to wait 2 weeks. I ordered the Fishmox received it fast from Amazon, took it 4 times a day and within 5 days the sinus infection was gone! Stayed on it for 10 days total. I saved $100 doctors visit and $90
Amoxicillin purchase (I have no medical insurance). It is real Amoxicillin. It worked for me.’
3)   Pharmaceutical Grade Amoxicillin, February 25, 2011 By J. Ellison (Silverton, oregon) –
This review is from: Fish Mox (Amoxicillin) 250mg, 100 Capsules (Misc.)
“Fish-Mox is pharmaceutical grade Amoxicillin made in Tolleson AZ, & is same as Human Antibiotic. Capsule has FDA lot & Registration number printed on each Cap. Is non-suspended yellow powder in a pull-apart gelatin capsule. It’s the Real-McCoy; Excellent value. JE Oregon”
4)  Fish Mox (Amoxicillin) 250mg, 100 Capsules, February 2, 2011 By nubbles. This review is from: Fish Mox (Amoxicillin) 250mg, 100 Capsules (Misc.)
‘This is the real deal pharmacy grade Amoxicillin, 250mg, 100 caps. Of course it’s for aquarium use only, but if you accidentally take some yourself, for let’s say calming your abscessed tooth down, you will be very OK. and if your dog accidentally eats a couple a day it might accidentally calm down his ear yeast infection. Order with confidence! and upon arrival you can inspect the pills, enter the ID on them ‘westward 938’ into google and you will see info from FDA and others telling you these are the real deal.”
5)  100% Amoxicillan, See Below……, December 10, 2010 By Westfin. This review is from: Fish Mox (Amoxicillin) 250mg, 100 Capsules (Misc.)
“I just received my order of Fish Mox, which will be used for my fish, but I was curious so I looked up the name and number from one of the capsules and here are the results: http://www.drugs.com/imprints/west-ward-938-15375.html
[“West-ward 938”, Pill imprint West-ward 938 has been identified as Amoxicillin 250 mg. Amoxicillin is used in the treatment of urinary tract infection; bacterial infection; bladder infection; bronchitis; upper respiratory tract infection (and more), and belongs to the drug class aminopenicillins. There is no proven risk in humans during pregnancy”….]


C.  Doxycycline
Doxycycline is a synthetic (man-made) antibiotic derived from tetracycline.
Doxycycline is used for many different types of infections, including respiratory tract infections due to Hemophilus influenzae(1), Streptococcus pneumoniae(2), or Mycoplasma pneumoniae (3). It also is used for the treatment of nongonococcal urethritis (due to Ureaplasma), Rocky mountain spotted fever (tick, flea & lice bites), typhus, cancroids, cholera, brucellosis, anthrax, bubonic plague, syphilis, diarrhea, and acne, chronic prostatitis, sinusitis, chlamydia, pelvic inflammatory disease, acne, rosacea, and Rickettsial infections.
Preparations: Capsules: 40, 50, 75, and 100 mg. Tablets: 50, 75, 100, and 150 mg.
*  Amazon.com: Aqua-Doxy  (Doxycycline) 100mg Tablets – 30 Count, $6.99 =$5.00 S&H=$11.99 each.

Product Description
One bottle of Aqua-Doxy 30 Tablets. 100 mg USP pharmaceutical grade Doxycycline Hyclate per capsule. What you see is what you get – no generic substitutes. Labeled for ornamental fish use.

Customer review
1)  Successfully helped our “little guy“, January 1, 2010 By Jeffrey Baitis re.  Aqua-Doxy 100mg Tablets – 30 Count (Misc.)
“It’s very good to take your animals to a vet if you suspect illness. That stated, we suspected one of our guinea pigs had an upper respiratory tract infection, and read on guinealynx.info that guinea pigs are often treated successfully with doxycycline 5mg/kg q12h. With a pet that costs $5, I elected to medicate the fuzzball myself. It was great to find a few doxycycline hyclate tablets for a low price on Amazon, shipped directly to our door (and quickly). Our guinea pig improved within about three days; within a week, his cough was completely absent. We continued to medicate him for another five days to try to ensure that any possible antibotic-resistant bacteria would be eliminated.
Of course, in this case, causality cannot be established since we merely guessed that the pig had a bacterial infection… but we think this stuff did the trick!”
2)  works well, September 16, 2010. By lynn (ct) Aqua-Doxy 100mg Tablets – 30 Count (Misc.)
“my rats suffer from frequent uri’s and with my vets permission i can treat flare ups at home with this product without the hassle of an office visit. i follow my vets dosage instructions and if they dont improve i schedule a vet visit but so far these have saved me a bundle.”
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 D.  Tetracycline
* Amazon.com: Fish Cycline (Tetracycline) 250 mg – 100 Caps, by Thomas Laboratories, $13.79  + free Shipping

Product Features
•  Exerts bacterial action on gram-positive
•  And some gram-negative bacteria
•  For ornamental and aquarium fish only

Product Description
Non-prescription tetracycline labeled for fish or aquarium use for the control of common bacterial infections. Each capsule contains 250 mg tetracycline. Directions: Add contents of capsule to aquarium water at the rate of 1 (250 mg. capsule) per 10 gals. Repeat in 24 hours. Continue treatment for 5-10 days.

 BE CAREFUL WITH TETRACYCLINE! Make sure you know the expiration date and mark it down on EVERY bottle you store it in. After it expires Tetracycline becomes toxic.

 Customer reviews
1)  It’s Tetracycline, pure and simple, February 16, 2007, By K. Yates
This review is from: Fish Cycline (Tetracycline 250 mg) – 100 Caps (Misc.)
“Tired of $75 to ??? (Where is the limit?) doctor’s visits to get an antibiotic for an infection? If you are savvy enough to know when you have what, you may want to know that the exact same antibiotic is available to dope your fish tank and retard the growth of unhealthy bacteria. And you won’t go to the pharmacy and pay $50 to $100 for 30 to 50 caplets. This is a bottle of 100 caplets for less than $28 or, at least it was when I reordered from the vet supply house that ships it. (Where I also found 100 – 500mg caps for the same price.)”
2)  I haven’t died yet!, June 14, 2009, By lisa simpson ” This review is from: Fish Cycline (Tetracycline 250 mg) – 100 Caps (Misc.)
“I have used these Thomas Labs antibiotics for years. They are USP grade- United States Pharmaceutical grade. If you really want to pay $85 for an office visit, $30 for a strep screen, then $30 for 30 Amoxicillin capsules, then go for it! But I don’t have that kind of $$$$$!”


E.  Zithromax
* Amazon.com:  Aquatic Azithromycin, (Zithromax) 250mg. 30 Count Tablets, Antibiotic USP by Aquatic Pharmacy

Product Features
•  All our products are pharmaceutical grade [USP ] The highest quality.
•  Not for human consumption or aquatic species meant for food.
•  Labeled for aquatic use only. (Therefore no prescription needed)
•  Dosage and direction for aquatic use, on bottle.
•  All bottles are safety sealed and have child resistant cap

Product Description
Each tablet contains: Azithromycin, 250mg., 30 count tablets USP…..Azithromycin is a semisynthetic broad spectrum antibiotic, for treatment against many gram-positive and gram-negative microorganisms.

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II.  Antibiotic prescription, general dosage
Pasted from: http://www.survivalistboards.com/showthread.php?t=14441
Also: http://www.allthingsnow.com/all/survival/shared/15584307/Fish-Antobiotics-For-Human-Use-Survivalist-Forum

Penicillin, give 500 mg by mouth 4 times a day (qid) for Streptococcal, pneumococcal infections, anaerobic infections “above the diaphragm” such as abscessed teeth. Although its spectrum is limited, this drug is relatively cheap and causes fewer side effects such as diarrhea and vaginitis. Unfortunately, streptococci and pneumococci are increasingly resistant.

Amoxicillin,  250mg. Give 250 to 500 mg by mouth (id) every 12 hours, for urinary, middle ear, and lower respiratory infection (bronchia and lungs). This is a broader spectrum penicillin. Staphylococci are usually resistant.

Erythromycin, 400 mg. Give two tablets twice daily (bid) for pneumonia or Streptococcal sore throat. The drug is also of some benefit in Staphylococcal skin infections.

Tetracycline 250 mg Give 250-500 mg by mouth 4 times a day (qid)  for plague and various other insect-born infections; urinary infections; bronchitis; infected animal bites; some venereal diseases; Rocky Mountain spotted fever. Avoid this class of drug in pregnant women and young children, if possible.

Doxycycline 100 mg, which is given once daily (twice for severe infections). Doxycycline has fewer gastrointestinal side effects and is better absorbed than tetracycline with food in the stomach, but is more likely to sensitize the skin to sunlight.

Metronidazole The usual dose is 500 mg three times a day (tid), higher for some infections (e.g. amebiasis). The drug is effective against certain protozoans including amoebae and Giardia, and for anaerobic bacteria such as those that normally inhabit the bowel and the female genital tract. It can be extremely useful in intraabdominal , pelvic, and wound infections caused by such bacteria.

Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole Give one double strength (DS) tablet bid for urinary infections and some types of bacterial diarrhea, or as a back-up drug for sinusitis, bronchitis, ear infections (for resistant organisms or allergic patients).
Pasted from: http://www.survivalistboards.com/showthread.php?t=14441

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See also the informative YouTube videos with, “Patriot Nurse”. The following link takes you to her discussion of the  “Top 5 Antibiotics for SHTF”:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DOfthwm_v3E&feature=relmfu

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 See also the book, “The Doom and Bloom(tm) Survival Medicine Handbook” (Keep your loved ones healthy in every disaster, from wildfires to a complete societal collapse),  by  Joseph Alton, M.D. and AMY ALTON, A.R.N.P., sold through Amazon.com
.

III.  Things you should be aware of
A.  Why do people feel they need antibiotics without a prescription?
http://www.coreynahman.com/antibiotics.html   by Corey Nahman, Registered pharmacist in the Sate of New York.
(or, ‘Why not do what everyone else does – go to the doctor, get a prescription and take it to the drugstore?’)
There are many reasons people don’t want to obtain antibiotics the traditional way:
•  Persistent Infections – such as urinary tract infections.  You feel burning discomfort down there with an urgency to urinate and you know right away what you have because you get it all the time.  It is a pain in the neck having to run to the doctor for an expensive examination when you know what you have and what you need.
•  Skin Conditions – People who suffer from acne or rosacea often take antibiotics propholactically to prevent flare-ups.  They prefer to buy a large quantity of medicine for a cheap price rather than visiting dermatologist every time they need a refill.
•  Poverty, Lack of Insurance, Cultural Norms – many people, such as undocumented immigrants, work for small businesses.  They get zero benefits.  They can’t afford the doctor and they can’t afford American drug prices.  Often, they come from cultures where prescriptions are not required for antibiotics.

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B.  Why is buying prescription drugs without a prescription potentially dangerous?
http://www.coreynahman.com/antibiotics.html   by Corey Nahman, Registered pharmacist in the Sate of New York.
If you get your antibiotics without going to a doctor and getting a prescription, you can get yourself in trouble, just understand the following as they may refer to you:
•  Misdiagnosis: Antibiotics (of any kind) are not a cure-all.  They are only effective to against bacterial illnesses. They are not effective against  viral illnesses.
Antibiotics are designed to combat specific ailments.  For instance, penicillins (a family of drugs with names ending in “-cillin” such as penicillin, amoxicillin, ampicillin) are effective against streptococcal infections, syphilis, and Lyme disease but for community-acquired pneumonia, bacterial diarrhea, mycoplasmal infections or gonorrhea you would be better off using a quinolone (a family of drugs with names ending in “-oxacin such as levofloxacin (Levaquin) or Ciprofloxacin (Cipro).
A doctor is an expert in knowing which antibiotic to use for specific ailments.  If an untrained person uses the wrong antibiotic his condition may get worse and as a result, he may wind up in the hospital.
•  Side Effects: Antibiotics can cause side effects.  If you take an antibiotic that you are allergic to you could develop an anaphylactic reaction, go into shock and die.  Other  antibiotic side effects include nausea and diarrhea, abdominal pain, liver toxicity, brain and kidney damage or even pseudomembranoous colitis.
•  Interactions (Drug, Food, Alcohol): Certain antibiotics should not be mixed with other drugs, foods  or alcohol. For example, drinking grapefruit juice with erythromycins or taking erythromycin with theophylline (a drug used for respiratory ailments) can cause fatal heart arrhythmias. There are many other interactions that doctors know about but you don’t. [Erythromycin is  not one of the antibiotics considered in our TEOTWAWKI medicine chest.]
•  Resistance: No-prescription antibiotics are likely to be misused leading to drug resistance.  Drug resistant germs are difficult to treat and have spread into the community wreaking havoc on our healthcare institutions.
•  Conclusion: Buying antibiotics without a doctor’s prescription is easy.  The drugs are inexpensive.  This is a potentially dangerous practice but it is unlikely to stop because it is a low priority for law enforcement institutions.

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Filed under Survival Manual, __6. Medical, ___d) Medicine & Supplement

Tuberculosis

(Survival Manual/ 6. Medical/ b) Disease/ Tuberculosis)

Important points to remember from this article:
•  More than two billion people, equal to one-third of the world’s total population, are infected with TB bacilli.
•  TB remains a disease of poverty and poor health services.
• [Should there occur a SHTF/ TEOTWAWKI event drastically lowering global living standards, expect Tuberculosis rates & overall numbers to increase. At present, Tuberculosis is a fringe disease for we who live in the affluent West, that could change. Just remember, if the global economy goes south and stays down for an extended length of time, people with “a cough that just won’t go away” may have contracted Tuberculosis. See “Signs and Symptoms”, below. Mr Larry]


A.  World Tuberculosis Day 2011
19 August 2011, Doctor NDTV, Aman subeditor
Pasted from: <http://doctor.ndtv.com/storypage/ndtv/id/5055/type/feature/World_Tuberculosis_Day_2011.html?cp>

World Tuberculosis (TB) Day, which falls on March 24 every year, aims to raise public awareness about tuberculosis, a preventable disease. Tuberculosis is still an epidemic in many regions of the world, annihilating the lives of many millions of people each year. Each year, over nine million people around the world get infected with TB and almost two million TB related deaths are recorded worldwide. The actual figures must be far larger than this.

For World TB Day 2011, we enter the second year of a two-year campaign – “On the move against tuberculosis”. The campaign aims to inspire innovation in TB research and care. The 2011 World TB Day campaign is focused on individuals around the world who have found new ways to stop TB and can serve as an inspiration to others. The basic idea is to recognise people who have introduced a variety of innovations in a variety of settings. The objectives of TB day are listed below:

  • Research aimed at developing new diagnostics, drugs or vaccines
  • Operational research, aimed at making TB care more effective and efficient
  • New approaches to helping people gain access to TB diagnosis and treatment
  • Novel partnerships between actors in the fight against TB
  • Advances in integrating TB care into health systems
  • New approaches to providing support from members of the community to people affected by TB
  • Innovative ways of raising awareness about TB.

According to World Health Organization (WHO), here are some interesting facts about tuberculosis:
Fact 1 – Tuberculosis is contagious and spreads through air. If not treated, each person with active TB can infect on average 10 to 15 people a year.
Fact 2 – More than two billion people, equal to one third of the world’s total population, are infected with TB bacilli, the microbes that cause TB. One in every 10 of those people will become sick with active TB in his or her lifetime. People living with HIV are at a much higher risk.
Fact 3 – A total of 1.7 million people died from TB in 2009 (including 3, 80,000 people with HIV), equal to about 4,700 deaths a day. TB is a disease of poverty, affecting mostly young adults in their most productive years. The vast majority of TB deaths are in the developing world, with more than half occurring in Asia.
Fact 4 – TB is a leading killer among people living with HIV, who have weakened immune systems.
Fact 5 – There were 9.4 million new TB cases in 2009, of which 80% were in just 22 countries. Per capita, the global TB incidence rate is falling, but the rate of decline is very slow – less than 1%.
Fact 6 – TB is a worldwide pandemic. Among the 15 countries with the highest estimated TB incidence rates, 13 are in Africa, while a third of all new cases are in India and China.
Fact 7 – Multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB) is a form of TB that does not respond to the standard treatments using first-line drugs. MDR-TB is present in virtually all countries surveyed by WHO and its partners.
Fact 8 – There were an estimated 4, 40,000 new MDR-TB cases in 2008 [drug resistant] with three countries accounting for over 50% of all cases globally – China, India and the Russian Federation. Extensively drug-resistant TB (XDR-TB) occurs when resistance to second-line drugs develops. It is extremely difficult to treat and cases have been confirmed in more than 58 countries.
Fact 9 – The world is on track to achieve two TB targets set for 2015:
•  Millennium Development Goal, which aims to halt and reverse global incidence (in comparison with 1990); and
•  Stop TB Partnership target of halving deaths from TB (also in comparison with 1990).
Fact 10 – Forty one million TB patients have been successfully treated in DOTS programmes and up to 6 million lives saved since 1995, 5 million more lives could be saved between now and 2015 by fully funding and implementing The Global Plan to Stop TB 2011-2015

The global epidemic of tuberculosis (TB) 
It is estimated that 1.7 million people died of tuberculosis in 2009. There were an estimated 9.4 million new cases of tuberculosis in 2009 of which the majority were in Asia and Africa. It is thought that the rates of new tuberculosis infections and deaths per capita have probably been falling globally for several years now. However, the total number of new tuberculosis cases is still slowly rising due to population growth.

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B.  Control of Tuberculosis (TB)
October 24, 2005- February 11, 2006, About.com, by Jerry Kennard and the MEDICAL Review Board
Pasted from: <http://menshealth.about.com/od/diseases/a/tb.htm&gt;
and <http://menshealth.about.com/od/diseases/a/treatment_tb.htm&gt;

In the 1959s the US and many European countries introduced immunization programs. As a result the incidence of TB fell dramatically. In the late 1980s there was a resurgence of TB cases in the large cities of the US and in Europe. This has been for a number of reasons, among them;

Homelessness; overcrowding in shelters, prisons and in homes for the poor; increased immigration from countries with a high incidence of TB; drug abuse; HIV/AIDS.

Facts About Tuberculosis (TB)
According to the World Health Organization (WHO) each year around eight million people develop TB. Every year about 2 million people die from TB, a curable disease. Every second somewhere in the world someone gets infected with TB bacilli. The World Health Organization estimates that about one-third of the world’s population is currently infected with the TB bacillus.

In the USA the tuberculosis (TB) infection rate in the United States fell to a record low in 2004. A total of 14,511 active TB infections, or 4.9 cases per 100,000 people, were reported to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Tuberculosis (TB) is a contagious disease caused by the bacillus Mycobacterium tuberculosis. TB spreads through the air. The usual form is pulmonary TB, which affects the lungs. Only people who are sick with TB in their lungs are infectious.
It is important to know that not everyone infected with TB germs develops active TB. About 5-10% of people who are infected with TB bacilli become sick or infectious at some time during their life.

Although TB most commonly affects the lungs, TB germs can also spread to other organs in the body (extra-pulmonary TB). This air borne infection is spread through coughs, sneezes and spitting of infected material. It only takes a few inhaled germs to become infected but In general, you need prolonged exposure to an infected person before becoming infected yourself.
Someone with a compromised or weakened immune system is more likely to become infected with Tuberculosis. TB remains a disease of poverty and poor health services.
TB has been around for many thousands of years. It has been found in bones dating back at least 5,000 years.

Signs and Symptoms of Active Tuberculosis (TB)
Signs and symptoms of active pulmonary TB are usually
  A cough lasting three or more weeks
  Discolored or bloody sputum
  Weight loss
 Fatigue
  Slight fever
  Night sweats
  Chills
  Loss of appetite
  Pain when breathing or coughing (pleurisy)
Tuberculosis can also occur in other parts of your body. These include your joints, bones, bone marrow, muscles, urinary tract, lymphatic system and central nervous system.

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C.  Treatment and Control of Tuberculosis
October 24, 2005, About.com, Jerry Kennard and reviewed by the Medical Review Board
Pasted from: <http://menshealth.about.com/od/diseases/a/treatment_tb.htm

Treatment for Tuberculosis (TB)
Treatment for TB was only available from about 50 years ago. Active tuberculosis, if not treated, will infect on average between 10 and 15 people every year. If active tuberculosis is not treated it can kill and treatment currently reaches only about a quarter of people with Tuberculosis.

Antibiotics are used in the treatment of Tuberculosis (TB). Antibiotic treatment therapy is lengthy and you have to take them for six to 12 months to completely destroy the bacteria. The length of treatment and the type of drug that is needed is determined by your age, overall health, the results of susceptibility tests, and whether you have TB infection or active TB.

It is the length of drug treatment that causes so many difficulties in developing countries as well as in the West. Poor supervision, incomplete treatment, doctors and health workers prescribing the wrong treatment regimens, or an unreliable drug supply not only fails to treat TB but can lead drug-resistant TB.
Surgery is now very rarely used to treat TB.

Drug-resistant Tuberculosis TB Treatment
Strains that are resistant to a single drug have been documented in every country. A particularly dangerous form of drug-resistant TB is multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB) Rates of MDR-TB are high in many countries including the former Soviet Union.
People infected with the drug resistant strain will pass on the same drug-resistant strain when they infect others. While drug-resistant TB is generally treatable, it requires extensive chemotherapy, sometimes up to 2 years of treatment. The medication required for drug resistant TB is extremely expensive, often more than 100 times more expensive than treatment of drug-susceptible tuberculosis. Treatment is often more toxic to patients and not so well tolerated.

 

D.    Risk factors
Anyone can get tuberculosis, but certain factors can increase your risk of the disease. These factors include:
_1) Weakened immune system
A healthy immune system can often successfully fight TB bacteria, but your body can’t mount an effective defense if your resistance is low. A number of diseases and medications can weaken your immune system, including:

  • HIV/AIDS
  • Diabetes
  • End-stage kidney disease
  • Cancer treatment, such as chemotherapy
  • Drugs to prevent rejection of transplanted organs
  • Some drugs used to treat rheumatoid arthritis, Crohn’s disease and psoriasis
  • Malnutrition
  • Advanced age

_2) International connections
TB risk is higher for people who live in or travel to countries that have high rates of tuberculosis, such as:

  • Sub-Saharan Africa
  • India
  • China
  • Mexico
  • The islands of Southeast Asia and Micronesia
  • Parts of the former Soviet Union

_3) Poverty and substance abuse

  • Lack of medical care. If you are on a low or fixed income, live in a remote area, have recently immigrated to the United States or are homeless, you may lack access to the medical care needed to diagnose and treat TB.
  • Substance abuse. Long-term drug or alcohol use weakens your immune system and makes you more vulnerable to tuberculosis.
  • Where you work or live
  • Health care work. Regular contact with people who are ill increases your chances of exposure to TB bacteria. Wearing a mask and frequent hand-washing greatly reduce your risk.
  • Living or working in a residential care facility. People who live or work in prisons, immigration centers or nursing homes are all at risk of tuberculosis. That’s because the risk of the disease is higher anywhere there is overcrowding and poor ventilation.
  • Living in a refugee camp or shelter. Weakened by poor nutrition and ill health and living in crowded, unsanitary conditions, refugees are at especially high risk of tuberculosis infection.

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E.  TB Medical Advisory Board Statement on the Treatment of Active Tuberculosis in Adults
 Pasted from <http://www.in.gov/isdh/19686.htm>
Recommended Treatment Regimens
Unless there are contraindications, patients with active tuberculosis should be treated initially with four drugs: isoniazid (INH), rifampin (RIF), pyrazinamide (PZA), and ethambutol (EMB). Four drugs are recommended because (1) EMB helps to prevent the emergence of RIF-resistant organisms when primary resistance to INH may be present; (2) INH resistance continues to occur in our state, (3) foreign-borne persons from countries with high rates of drug resistance make up a growing number of TB cases in Indiana, and (4) six-month treatment regimens are not possible without the use of PZA.

 Use of Drugs Other Than INH, RIF, PZA, or EMB
There are no substitutes for any of the first-line agents. Before rifampin was available, TB patients had to take medication for 18-24 months. The combination of INH and rifampin allowed completion of therapy within 9 months. Routine addition of PZA during the first two months has shortened duration of therapy to 6 months for most cases. Ethambutol is known as a ‘companion drug,’ and has bacteriostatic activity. Its primary purpose is to suppress the further development of resistance in situations where INH resistance is already present at diagnosis. Ethambutol can be discontinued as soon as the organism is known to be susceptible to both INH and RIF.

The drugs are not interchangeable. Second-line agents must be used when patients cannot take first-line drugs because of resistance or intolerance. These second-line agents are substantially less active, and not without risks of toxicity. Patients taking second-line drugs in lieu of both INH and RIF require treatment durations of up to 2 years with frequent monitoring for side effects.

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F.  Prevention
Pasted from <http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/tuberculosis/DS00372/DSECTION=coping-and-support>
If you test positive for latent TB infection, your doctor may advise you to take medications to reduce your risk of developing active tuberculosis. The only type of tuberculosis that is contagious is the active variety, when it affects the lungs. So if you can prevent your latent tuberculosis from becoming active, you won’t transmit tuberculosis to anyone else.

Protect your family and friends
If you have active TB, keep your germs to yourself. It generally takes a few weeks of treatment with TB medications before you’re not contagious anymore. Follow these tips to help keep your friends and family from getting sick:

  • Stay home. Don’t go to work or school or sleep in a room with other people during the first few weeks of treatment for active tuberculosis.
  • Ventilate the room. Tuberculosis germs spread more easily in small closed spaces where air doesn’t move. If it’s not too cold outdoors, open the windows and use a fan to blow indoor air outside.
  • Cover your mouth. Use a tissue to cover your mouth anytime you laugh, sneeze or cough. Put the dirty tissue in a bag, seal it and throw it away.
  • Wear a mask. Wearing a surgical mask when you’re around other people during the first three weeks of treatment may help lessen the risk of transmission.

Finish your entire course of medication
This is the most important step you can take to protect yourself and others from tuberculosis. When you stop treatment early or skip doses, TB bacteria have a chance to develop mutations that allow them to survive the most potent TB drugs. The resulting drug-resistant strains are much more deadly and difficult to treat.

Vaccinations
In countries where tuberculosis is more common, infants are vaccinated with bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) vaccine because it can prevent severe tuberculosis in children. The BCG vaccine isn’t recommended for general use in the United States because it isn’t very effective in adults and it causes a false-positive result on a TB skin test. Researchers are working on developing a more effective TB vaccine.

Coping and support
Undergoing treatment for tuberculosis is a complicated and lengthy process. But the only way to cure the disease is to stick with your treatment. You may find it helpful to have your medication given by a nurse or other health care professional so that you don’t have to remember to take it on your own. In addition, try to maintain your normal activities and hobbies, and stay connected with family and friends.

Keep in mind that your physical health can affect your mental health. Denial, anger and frustration are normal when you must deal with something difficult and unexpected. At times, you may need more tools to deal with these or other emotions. Professionals, such as therapists or behavioral psychologists, can help you develop positive coping strategies.

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Filed under Survival Manual, __6. Medical, ___b) Disease

First Aid Supply List

(Survival Manual/ 6. Medical/ c) General Clinic/ First Aid supply list)

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The three top killers of mankind  are:
1) Upper Respiratory Infection,
2) Diarrhea and
3) Skin Infections.
Your household medical kit should be weighted heavily to cover against  these diseases

Your personal or group’s specific needs obviously determine the type and amount of stored medicinal items. Most of the items everyone should have, others are related to personal health issues. Where as one family might need to store more antacids, another may need a larger supply ion antihistamines, etc.

 I developed the following personal list, to track purchase locations, expiration date, item cost and a lilttle information about the product. The width of the list has been reduced to fit in the columnar confines of the WordPress blog page. To keep track of the supplier, I used a code like G= Walgreen’s, W=Walmart. A=Amazon.com, where  most of the itmes were purchased. Items with expiration date were simply entered below the suppliers code name, ie W/7-15-2014, meaning  “Bought at Walmart, expires July 15, 2014.” If a situation arose that looked extremely serious, the one area of supply that I would want to seriosly increase would be the antibiotics, also several extra gallons of regular, unscented household clorox (not listed).

WHERETO BUY/EXP DATE COST IN STOCK ITEM
PAIN RELIEF-FEVER

W

08/2013

 $7.98  x Tylenol, extra strength 100 tablets: Temporarily relieves minor aches and pains due to: headache, muscular aches, backache, arthritis, the common cold, toothache, menstrual cramps, temporarily reduces fever.
Equate Ibuprofen, 200 mg x 24 tablets
Benedryl
EverCool Cooling bandana’s (3 pack), $10.01: Included 2 in F.A. kit. Have special polymer beads that are sewn in. When soaked in water, they expand to 100x their original size. The coolness comes from the polymer beads retaining the water and evaporation the process can last several days.
HAIR-EYE-NOSE-LIP
2- Head & Shoulders shampoos, 1.7 fl oz ea.
Hartz Flea & Tick Powder (for dogs), 4 oz. or Hunter’s Brand Flea and Tick Quick Kill 16 oz/ or another brand in powder/shampoo/drops
Bausch & Lomb Eye relief Eye Wash with eye cup, 4 fl. Oz.
Equate Sterile Gentle Lubricant Eye Drops, 1 fl oz.
Bacitracin, mupirocin, or other antibacterial Eye ointment
Blistex Silk and Shine lip balm.
DENTAL
Dental floss picks. Plankers Micro mint. Dental flosser, 90 ct.
2- pack Oral B Medium toothbrushes.
Dentemp O.S. One Step, Caps and Fillings Repair, 8+ Repairs, 2g Blister (Pack of 6)
Clove oil, 2 oz., Now Essential Oils
Dental pick, 4 pc. carver and probe set, stainless steel, $6.33.Stainless 6:” dental mirror, $5.52.Tartar remover/scraper 6.5” handle, $3.95
Sensodyne Cool Gel with fluoride: toothpaste and topical tooth pain reliever for sensitive teeth, 4 oz.
Cool Mint Listerine antiseptic mouth wash, 8.5 fl oz.
RESPIRATORY SYSTEM
Thermometer, oral, mercury
Vics Vaporub ointment, 1.76 oz., topical cough medicine with medicated vapors that works quickly for adults as well to relieve cough symptoms
box Kleenix
N95 NIOSH approved respirators, 3M, 20/pack, to reduce exposure to airborne disease particles.
Surgical Procedure masks, earloop, 50 ct.; ‘isolation masks’, for infected person to wear, protects others from large respiratory droplets.
Halls Mentho-lypts cough drops. Relieves cough and sore throat. 30 ct.
Equate Cold Multi-Symptom or Wal-Flu: (Acetaminophen) pain reliever/ fever reducer/ antihistamine/ cough suppressant/ nasal decongestant infused with chamomile and white tea flavors. 2 pkg of 24 gel caps ea.
Walgreens Wal-Four Nasal Decongestant Spray, 1 oz., Temporarily relieves nasal & sinus congestion, swollen nasal membranes; for common cold, hay fever.
Saline Nasal Spray, 1.5 oz-For dry nasal membranes
Mucus relief: (Guaifenesin – 600 mg x 40 tablets) Expectorant. Helps loosen phlegm (mucus) and thin bronchial secretions to rid the bronchial passageways of bothersome mucus and make coughs more productive.
STOMACH
Prilosec, 42 tablets
Equate anti-diarrheal, (loperamide hydrochloride) 48 caplets
Natrol Acidophilus Probiotic Capsules, Dietary Supplement. Guaranteed 3 billion live cultures – at time of manufacture. Helps ease occasional stomach discomfort. By taking Natrol Acidophilus each day, you can: Help maintain a healthy balance of friendly bacteria in your digestive system. Promote digestive health. Help improve lactose intolerance.
Emergen-C: Super orange, 1000 mg Vit C+24 nutrients with antioxidents, ELECTROLYTES & 7 B vitamins. 30 packets
Humco Castor Oil, For relief of occasional constipation, stimulant laxative produces bowel movement in 6 to 12 hours.
Equate gas relief, (simethicone) 60 soft gels
1-Magnesium Citrate, 10 oz, powerful system cleaning laxative used in hospitals, 3 bottle/doses.
Dulcolax laxative Suppository, 4 suppositories
Bragg organic apple cider vinegar 2 ea 16 oz bottles.
Equate Motion Sickness 50 mg x 100 tablets: Helps treat symptoms associated with motion sickness; nausea, vomiting and dizziness, $8.68
TOPICAL-SKIN CARE
hydrogen peroxide, 3%, 16 oz.- Topical Use against infection by decreasing germs In minor cuts, burns, and abrasions
70% Isopropyl alcohol, 16 oz
Tea Tree oil- natural antiseptic, bactericide, fungicide, rashes
Petroleum jelly-relieves dry skin and chaffing, for minor burns
Caladryl or Calamine lotion- poison oak, etc.
Backwoods Cutter Insect repellant, 6 oz spray can, 23%DEET. Or Repel 100 –insect repellent, 100% DEET
Equate Sport Sunscreen spf 50, 8 oz.
Johnson’s Baby Powder, 1.5 oz.
Dermoplast antibacterial spray- for burns, relieves pain, Benzethonium Chloride
Cortizone10 or Aveeno 1% Hydrocortisone cream/gel- Hydrocortizone 1%: Relief of itching due to inflammation and from: Eczema, Psoriasis, Seborrheic Dermatitis, Poison Ivy/Oak/Sumac, insect bites, rashes from soaps, detergents, cosmetics and jewelry.
Equate Triple Antibiotic Ointment 1 oz.- Contains Bacitracin Zinc, Neomycin Sulfate, Polymyxin B Sulfate- used to prevent minor skin injuries such as cuts, scrapes, and burns from becoming infected.
Vagisil, 1 oz.- Pain/itch relieving creamsoothes and relieves external feminine itching, burning and irritation, soothes with benzocaine & resorcinol
Equate Antibacterial liquid handsoap, 7.5 oz.
WOUNDS
Trim, 2 – Mini slant & Point tweezers
Splinter Out splinter remover 20/box,
2- elastic bandages, 2”x 2 yards, Ace wrap Type,
Coach elastic bandages, 3”x 2 yards, Ace wrap Type
3 ea. Rolled gauze bandage, 2×2.5 yds
Johnson & Johnson First Aid Covers Gauze Pads Large 4″ x 4″, 10 ct
Johnson & Johnson Medium gauze pads, 2”X2”, 10ct.
CuradBand-Aid Adhesive Bandages, Assorted Sizes 100 ea
Johnson & Johnson Red Cross Mirasorb Gauze Sponges. 50 ct 4”x4”cleaning and prepping light-to-moderately draining wounds and applying medication. Or 100% cotton facial cleansing pads, 60ct (costmetic area)
Bandage scissors
Johnson & Johnson first aid tape, roll ½”x 6yds
Gold Bond Medicated Foot Powder, 4 oz.
Mole skin, 3 sheets, 4-5/8”x3-3/8”
Finger splints, plastic, 3 ea.
TENDON & SKELETAL
Mueller Adjust to fit Ankle brace, one size, fits L or R ankle.
Mueller Self adjusting Knee stabilizer, $14.28
Arm sling/triangular bandage/bandana
Epsom Salts, 4 lbs (magnesium sulfate) soaking aid for minor sprains and bruises, saline solution for short term relief of constipation.
Instant Cold Pack, 2 pack
ANTIBIOTICS
1- Fish Mox (Amoxicillin) 250mg, 100 Capsules
1- Fish Cillin (Ampicillin) 250 mg – 100 Caps
3 ea. Aqua-Doxy (Doxycycline) 100mg Tablets – 30 Count
1- Fish Cycline (Tetracycline) 250 mg – 100 Caps
SUPPLEMENTS
Finest Natural B-12 Vitamin 1000 mcg. 2x 150 tablet bottles. Dietary Supplement Tablets. Contribute to normal brain function and for nervous system health. 1000 micrograms every day. A low level of vitamin B12 has also been associated with memory loss and other cognitive deficits, asthma, depression, AIDS, multiple sclerosis, tinnitus, diabetic neuropathy and low sperm counts. Eggs, cheese and some species of fish also supply small amounts, but vegetables and fruits are very poor sources. Several surveys have shown that most strict, long-term vegetarians are vitamin B12 deficient. Many elderly people are also deficient because their production of the intrinsic factor needed to absorb the vitamin from the small intestine decline rapidly with age.
Calcium tablets (Tums): consume enough calcium every day to maintain adequate blood and bone calcium levels. Recommended calcium intake for adults is 1,000 to 1,300 milligrams daily. Multi-vitamins typically do not contain more than 200 to 250 mg of calcium . Tums are 1000 mg /tablet with 40% elemental Ca.. Not to take with tetracycline or doxycycline antibiotics.
Vitamin C, 500 mg x 250 caplets
Spring Valley Vitamin D-3 Protect bone, joint, and immune health. vitamin D3 is extremely useful in absorbing calcium and phosphorus from the intestines so the two key minerals can be used by the body. Vitamin D3 is the vitamin that is used by humans. Receiving approximately 15 minutes of sunlight per day, if you are able, will provide you with all the Vitamin D you need. The FDA suggests that you consume 200 to 400 IU per day of Vitamin D if you are less than 50 years old. If you are over 50, it is suggested that you consume 600 IU. If you do not have adequate vitamin D in your diet, your bones can become brittle and more prone to breaks or fractures. According to the Vitamin D Council, research has implicated vitamin D deficiencies in the pathologies of 17 cancers, and implicated it in major diseases including depression, diabetes and heart disease.
Spring Valley Echincea 760 mg, 100 capsules. One of the most popular herbs in America today. Contains substances that enhance the activity of the immune system, relieve pain, reduce inflammation, and have hormonal, antiviral, and antioxidant effects. For general immune system stimulation, during colds, flu, upper respiratory tract infections, or bladder infections.
Finest Natural Magnesium 250 mgx 300 tablets. Dietary Supplement Tablets. Magnesium is an essential mineral and plays an important role in energy metabolism, protein synthesis, neuromuscular transmission and bone structure, energy support.
Equate Mature Men’s Multivitamin. Memory and concentration: Ginkgo, Heart health: With vitamins B6, B12, C, E and folic acid; Healthy blood pressure: With vitamins D, C, calcium and magnesium: Eye health: With vitamins E, A, C and zinc: Immunity: With vitamins C, A, E and selenium: Physical energy: With vitamins B6, B12, pantothenic acid, chromium and folic acid: More vitamin D.
Finest Natural One-Per-Day Omega-3 Fish Oil Softgels Softgels.Omega 3s are necessary for many vital functions in the body and have been shown to: Support heart health, Support mental performance and proper brain function, Support a healthy mood, Support healthy skin, nerve and joint function.
MISC
IOSAT potassium Iodide (anti radiation pills)
Water bulb for rinsing wounds and dental work.
scotch whisky, 2 pt, 4 ea. 50 ml.
Nolvasan Scented Disinfectant. Bactericide, virucide, 1 pt
Flashlight, aa batteries
Nitrile exam gloves, Ansell, about 100 store in a zip lock bag.
Kleenix Hand Towels, 60 each
Sterile towelettes, Wet Ones, 2 containers, 20+60 wipes
Tongue blades, (jumbo craft sticks) 75 ct.
Cotton balls, jumbo, pkg 70
Cotton swabs, purse pack, 30 ct.
(Sphygmomanometer) Omron HEM-780 Automatic Blood Pressure Monitor with ComFit Cuff, $69.73, or Omron Healthcare HEM-629N Portable Wrist Blood Pressure Monitor, $72.49
Medicine dropper (2)
Safety pins, assorted sizes, size 3- 2”, 30 ct
Condom, non lubricated
Book: ‘Nurses Drug Guide, 2009’
Book: ‘Where There Is No Dentist ‘

First Aid Kit Supply List
17 January 2011, The Survival Podcast Forum, by Dr. Kyle Christensen,
Pasted from <http://thesurvivalpodcast.com/forum/index.php?topic=23991.0&gt;

 First Aid Kit List
It is important that each of us has access to a good first aid kit and that you know how to use it. Assemble your kit now, before you need it.  Get a box or plastic tote and begin throwing things in.  You will be surprised how much you can find around the house before you need to make a run to the drug store. Tailor the contents to fit your family’s particular needs and lifestyle. Assemble them in a backpack or tool chest. Any bottle or container that is not labeled should be discarded.  “If in doubt, throw it out.” Check your kit periodically to update and restock.  Start using it now for any of your health needs.

A.  Tools
1. Tweezers and splinter removers– for removal of splinters or debris from skin or tissues.
2. Scissors – to cut bandages, cloth, etc.
3. Thermometer – for taking temperatures.
4. Tongue Depressors – for finger splints and for sad or depressed tongues.
5. Snake Bite Kit – in addition to snake bites, use for spider or insect bites.  A portable suction extractor devise is good to have on hand.
6. Cotton Applicator (Q-tips) – to apply herbs in small areas or to scrub and clean tissue.
7. Cotton balls
8. Instant Ice Pack – for sprains, strains, contusions when a freezer and ice is not available.  The “I” in R.I.C.E. (Rest, Ice, Compress, Elevate)
9. Chemical hot packs
10. Epi-Pen – epinephrine injection, if there is a history of severe allergic reactions.
11. Otoscope – this tool can be purchased inexpensively to view the ear canal.
12. Stethoscope & Blood Pressure Cuff – to monitor blood pressure and to listen to the heart/lungs.
13. Nail Clippers – specialized tool for nails (ingrown toenails)
14. Bulb Syringe – to forcefully rinse wounds, for small enemas, to extract mucus. Sterilize after every use.
15. Hot Water Bottle/Enema/Douche.
16. Dental Emergency Kit (includes mirror, probe – to view and examine mouth and teeth.)
17. Paper & pencil
18. Needles and thread
19. Burn Gel
20. Safety pins
21. Paper drinking cups
22. Dust masks/mirco filter masks (95N) – also to be used for protection from H1N1 or other viruses.
23. Knee Brace
24. Wrist Brace
25. Ankle Brace
26. Cool-Down Bandana – absorbs water and used to wrap around head or neck to cool fever
27. Surgical tool kit
28. String
29. Eye cup (to rinse eye)

B.  Bandages
1. 16-36 each Band-Aids – 1/2” x 3”, 3/4” x 4”, knuckles
2. Ace Bandages – 2”, 3” and 6”
3. Flannel – 11” x 14” – an old nightgown or shirt
4. Gauze – many sizes of both pads and rolls
5. Waterproof tape and Hypoallergenic tape
6. Vinyl examination gloves – one box to 1,000 gloves – multiple sizes if necessary for your family.
7. Feminine Napkins – Maxi-pads– for gun shot wounds & severe bleeding (not just female issues)
8. Moleskin AND Molefoam– for blisters or to protect skin from wear.
9. SAM Splint or some other splinting material– use for arms, legs, ankle or neck immobilization.
10. Aluminum finger splints
11. Butterfly bandages, Steri-Strips and Super Glue for wound closure.
12. Triangular bandages to make a sling or wrap.
13. Bandaging strips – cut or tear an old clean sheet into 4” strips that can be used for gauze, to wrap or bind injuries.
14. Non-adhering dressings [Telfa]
15.  Duct tape – great to remove warts – better than OTC treatments
16. Stick-It – (helps bandages to adhere to the skin)
17. Adhesive remover (like Goof-off)

 C.  Miscellaneous
1. Sea Salt – for mineral replacement in dehydration (Celtic Sea Salt, Redmond Real Salt)
2. Epsom Salt or Dead Sea Salt  – used to draw out toxins and radiation.          Used 1 –2 cups per bath.
3. Soap – liquid anti-bacterial or castile soap – to clean wounds and skin. I like Dr. Bronner’s Castile Soaps.
4. Apple Cider Vinegar – for arthritis (internally) and to wash the skin.
5. Baking Soda – used to neutralize acids burns, for re-hydration, and insect bites.
6. Hard Candy or Taffy to bring blood sugar up.  Its got to have real sugar in it.  No diabetic sugar-free candy.
7. Miso Soup – used nutritionally to ward off the effects of radiation.  Made into a soup/broth.
8. Rubbing Alcohol or alcohol preps – used to clean around wounds.
9. Potassium Iodide or Potassium Iodate – for thyroid protection against radiation – use as directed for dosage amounts.

D.  Non-Herbal Supplements to consider
1. Calcium
2. Magnesium – for electrolyte imbalances
3. Omega 3 oil
4. Vitamin C
5. Vitamin D3
6. Melatonin – for sleep
7. Air Borne – for immune system boost

E.  OTC (Over-the-Counter) from the Drug Store to consider for those not yet secure with herbal medicine.  In an emergency, you need to have what you are accustomed to using.
1. Triple Antibiotic ointment
2. Anti-fungal cream
3. Nystatin
4. Butt Paste – this stuff is great and not just for Butts – highest amount of zinc oxide
5. Lotion and sunscreen– for dry skin, sun protection (don’t forget your hat)
6. Petroleum jelly – to help seal exit wounds
7. Insect repellant – to ward of disease carrying mosquitos
8. Baby powder or corn starch (avoid talc as it can cause other problems)
9. Gold Bond Foot Powder
10. Dermoplast
11. Aloe Gel
12. Pregnancy tests
13. Condoms (not just for their intended use – they’re sterile)
14. Tummy relief – peptobismal tablets
15. Cough Drops – Halls or Ricola – get lots
16. Vics Vapor Rub
17. Benedryl cream
18. Generic Benedryl – DiPhenhydramine hydrochloride – for general sedating –esp. for children
19. Mucinex or Mucus relief – to clear lungs of congestion to prevent pneumonia
20. Electrolyte replacement (powdered Gatorade or similar product, or Sea Salt)
21. Saline solution – for eye rinse or wound cleansing
22. Carmax lip balm or chapstick
23. Mouthwash rinse
24. Dental Wax – for anyone with braces
25. Dental Floss
26. Floss threader for those with braces, bridges or hardware in their mouth
27. Iodine – for cleaning and prepping the skin
28. Antacid (Tums, Rolaids, etc.)
29. Baking soda
30. Calamine lotion
31. Decongestant tablets & spray
32. Diarrhea medication (to stop it, not give it to you)
33. Household ammonia
34. Hydrocortisone cream .5% to 1%
35. Hydrogen Peroxide – to cleanse wounds and disinfect
36. Alcohol – spirits – whiskey (use as a disinfectant wash)
37. Insect sting swabs or Meat Tenderizer (for insect bites) (Tea Tree oil works very good)
38. Oil of Cloves – for dental pain (aka Clove Essential Oil)
39. Aspirin – NSAID
40. Aleve/Naprosyn (naproxen) NSAID
41. Advil – Ibuprofen NSAID
42. Tylenol/Acetaminophen – Very hard on the liver – be cautious with use alternate with NSAIDs
43. Antibiotics and Prescription medications (hang on to what you’ve got “just in case”)  Observe expiration dates.
44. Sugar or glucose solution (or sugar candy)
45. Syrup of Ipecac – to induce vomiting (purge the stomach)
46. Tiger Balm or use Western Botanicals Deep Heat Oil or Ointment
47. Book: Nurses Drug Guide

F.  Emergency and Other Items to Consider
1. Cell phone and charger that utilizes the accessory plug in your car dash
2. Emergency phone numbers of all family, friends and contact information for your family doctor and pediatrician, local emergency services, emergency road service providers and the regional poison control center
3. Small, waterproof flashlight and extra batteries
4. Candles and matches for cold climates – when making a fire ignite it from a candle not a match.
5. Flint and Steel fire-starter.  Always have a backup method to start a fire.
6. Mylar emergency blanket
7. First-aid instruction manual – such as Herbal First Aid and Health Care, by Christensen – personally I have several that cover many different aspects of health and first aid.
8. Plastic bags and large garbage bags for the disposal of contaminated materials
9. Safety pins in assorted sizes
10. Paracord – 50 to 300 feet. Or other strong cord or rope.
11. Water purifying – chlorine bleach and/or hand water filter
12. Copies of important family documents
13. Whistle
14. Ear plugs
15. A good hat for everyone
16. Maps of the area and a compass
17. Clear Plastic sheeting to cover windows (if they break in an earthquake) and extra Duct tape
18. Tarps/stakes/twine/nails/rope/spikes
19. Good multipurpose knife and Scissors
20. Siphon & hand pumps
21. Boy Scout Handbook – use an old one that you don’t need to use –it’s a good reference book with lots of information
22. Work Gloves
23. Glue – Gorilla glue, wood glue and Super Glue
24. Extra Contacts, Glasses and Reading Glasses
25. Repair tools – screwdrivers, wrenches, vice grips, etc.
26. Wrenches/pliers to turn of water and gas to home
27. Sewing Awl
28. Bug Out Bag – 72 Hour Kit for each member of your household.  Don’t forget to keep on in your car so that emergency essentials are always on hand wherever you are.
29. Etc. – the list can go on forever.

For those  who have discovered the effectiveness and safety of Natural Healthcare and Herbal Products.
.
Herbal Formulas to consider
1. Immune Boost – used for infectious illness, feverish illness or a general immune system boost.
2. Colon Cleanse – an excellent herbal laxative that assists with elimination while building tone and strengthening the colon.
3. Colon Detox – used to deeply cleanse the colon, for diarrhea, used as a drawing poultice, for stings and bites.  Use internally for food poisoning.
4. Digestion Aid Formula – for indigestion, upset stomach or gastritis.
5. CTR Ointment (Complete Tissue Repair Ointment) – use to speed the healing of cuts, wounds, abrasions, bruises.  Any type of wound healing.
6. Lungs Plus formula – for asthma, pneumonia, bronchitis, any respiratory problem.
7. Deep Heat oil or ointment – for sprains, strains and muscular pain.  Also relieves earache (only use if eardrum is NOT ruptured).
8. CTR Syrup – used internally to speed the healing of any injury where tissue has been disrupted or damaged.
9. Earth Nutrition and/or Bountiful Blend – for concentrated whole food nutrition.  Improves health, energy and vitality.  Use daily to avoid illness while improving health.
10. Kidney-Bladder Formula – for urinary tract infection, incontinence, general edema (swelling) or kidney and bladder concerns.
11. Liver-Gallbladder Formula – for any liver condition (infectious or toxic), for digestive complaints.
12. Nerve Calm Formula – for nervous tension, irritation, insomnia or panic attacks.
13. Herbal Anti-Septic Formula – to cleanse and disinfect wounds.
14. Herbal Tooth Powder – for any teeth or gum infection or weakness.  Tightens loose teeth.
15. Herbal Ear Drops – used for earaches inside the ears as well massaged down the neck to milk congestion from the lymphatics.  Used also for external glandular swelling or cysts.
16. Herbal Mouthwash – for gingivitis, pyorrhea, and mouth sores.
17. Female Balance Formula – for any hormonally related female condition.
18. Anti-Plague Syrup – for any infectious condition that can result in death (the plague).  Use to boost and stimulate the immune system.
19. Herbal Snuff – for sinus congestion
20. Herbal Eyewash – cleans and disinfects (use a few drops in eyecup of pure water)

Single Herbs to consider
1. Cayenne tincture – used to stop bleeding, for shock and to increase circulation
2. Cayenne powder – for bleeding, shock and circulation
3. Milk Thistle powder – for liver protection against poisoning (Tylenol, mushrooms, etc.)
4. Lobelia tincture – relaxant, anti-spasmodic, for asthma (bronchial dilator), an emetic.
5. Peppermint essential oil – for digestion, opens the lungs and sinuses.
6. Tea Tree essential oil – topical anti-fungal, anti-bacterial
7. Oregano infused oil – sublingually used for anti-fungal, anti-bacterial, anti-viral, immune builder.
8. Clove essential oil – topical pain reliever for teeth or mouth sores.
9. Lavender essential oil – topical anti-bacterial, for insect bites.
10. Garlic infused oil – for ear infections, topical anti-bacterial, anti-fungal.
11. Slippery Elm bark powder – soothes digestive upsets, for colitis and irritable bowel.
12. Castor oil – used topically as a fomentation to relieve and reduce pain, inflammation, growths and swellings.
13. Shepherd’s Purse tincture – stops excessive bleeding, especially menstrual or related to childbirth.
14. Crystalized Ginger or Ginger capsules – used for motion sickness, dizziness, nausea, indigestion or taken for cold hands and feet.
15. Yarrow tincture – for fevers
16. Plantain tincture – for bites, stings, or skin irritations
17. Mullein tincture – calms and soothes digestion
18. Fennel tincture – for gas or bloating.
What did I miss?  Of course, we could list the whole hospital, but suggest any obvious item we can add.
This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any diseases, or replaces the services of a competent health care provider.  This program has not been evaluate or approved by the FDA.  By all means listen to your body and use common sense.
Compiled and Revised by Dr. Kyle Christensen, January 2011

———————————————————–

 Updated First Aid Kit List
1. Monistat (or other feminine yeast infection cream)
2. Witch Hazel or Prep H
3. Visine Regular Eye Drops
4. Visine Allergy Eye Drops
5. OraJel
6. Aamens Itch Powder
7. Flexible Drinking Straws
8. Eye Dropper
9. Sunglasses
10. Safety Glasses
11. Extra Rx Eye Glasses
12. Eye Glass Repair Kit
13. List of Medicine Allergies/Reactions
14. Medical History (blood type, current maintenance medication(s), immunizations, etc)

And for the little ones:
1. Children’s Tylenol/Motrin
2. Diaper Rash Cream or Corn Starch
3. Children’s Decongestant
4. Children’s Cough Meds
5. Pedialite

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